[Repost] From ‘A’ to ‘ampersand’, English is a wonderfully curious language (by Paul Anthony Jones)

Seen on facebook: RockstarTranslations

Original piece: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/feb/15/from-a-to-ampersand

From ‘A’ to ‘ampersand’, English is a wonderfully curious language

Forget selfies, belfies and twerking – practically every word in the English language has its own remarkable story
  • Paul Anthony Jones – theguardian.comSaturday 15 February 2014 08.59 GMT
Still from Ivanhoe

Sir Walter Scott coined the word “freelance” in Ivanhoe, using it to refer to a mercenary knight with no allegiance to one particular country and who instead offers his services for money. Photograph: The Ronald Grant Archive

This A to Z of word origins, adapted from Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons by Paul Anthony Jones, collects together 26 unusual etymologies – beginning with the last letter of the alphabet.

 

ampersand

 

Until as recently as the early 1900s, “&” was considered a letter of the alphabet and listed after Z in 27th position. To avoid confusion with the word “and”, anyone reciting the alphabet would add “per se” (“by itself”) to its name, so that the alphabet ended “X, Y, Z and per se &”. This final “and per se and” eventually ran together, and the “ampersand” was born.

bunkum

 

Proving that political long-windedness is nothing new, “bunkum” derives from Carolina’s Buncombe County. The local congressman, Felix Walker, gave such a lengthy and unnecessary speech to Congress in 1820 that its name became a byword for any tediously nonsensical rubbish.

croupier

 

A croupier was originally merely a gambler’s associate, whose job it was to back his companion’s wagers and give extra cash and advice during play. In the sense of “one who sits behind another” it is derived from croupe, an old French word for the hindquarters of a horse.

dismantle

Adapted into English from French in the 1500s, “dismantle” literally means “to remove a mantle” – in other words, to take off a cloak.

explode

 

The word “explode” is derived from the same Latin root as applause, and when it first appeared in the 17th century it actually meant “to jeer a performer off the stage”. It was from this sense of expelling something violently that the modern meaning developed in the mid-1700s.

freelance

 

Sir Walter Scott coined the word “freelance” in Ivanhoe, using it to refer to a mercenary knight with no allegiance to one particular country and who instead offers his services for money.

grenade

 

The earliest grenades mentioned in English date back five centuries. They took their name from an even older name for the pomegranate, which they were supposed to resemble.

hotchpotch

 

The jumbled hotchpotch, or hodgepodge, is thought to derive from the French hochepot, a meaty stew containing a similarly random medley of ingredients.

illustration

 

The word “illustration” originally meant “enlightenment” or “illumination”. Like lustre and illustriousness, it is descended from the Latin verb lucere, meaning “shine”.

Jurassic

 

The Jurassic in Jurassic Park derives from the Jura Mountains straddling the French-Swiss border, which are made of a form of limestone typical of the Jurassic period.

keelhaul

 

Keelhauling was originally precisely that – a brutal naval punishment in which the unfortunate victim would be tied to a rope looped around the keel of a ship, thrown overboard and hauled along its underside.

lemur

 

In Ancient Rome, “lemures” were the ghosts of murder victims, executed criminals, drowned sailors and other unfortunate souls who had died leaving some kind of unfinished business on Earth. These eerie, skeletal apparitions would walk the world of the living at night – and when the naturalist Carl Linnaeus first observed a number of surprisingly human-like creatures doing precisely that, he thought it was the perfect name.

maelstrom

 

Derived from the Dutch words for “whirl” and “stream”, the original maelstrom was a huge whirlpool off the Arctic coast of Norway that was apparently capable of drawing in ships from far away and pulling them beneath the waves.

noon

 

The word noon is a corruption of the Latin for “ninth”, “novem” (as in November). It originally referred to the ninth hour of the Roman day – reckoned by modern clocks to be around 3pm, not midday.

octopus

 

Of course the “octo” of octopuses (or rather octopodes to be absolutely correct) means”eight”, but “pus” doesn’t mean “leg” or “arm”, but rather “foot”. A platypus, similarly, is a “flat-footed” creature.

punch

 

As the name of a type of mixed alcoholic drink, “punch” was adopted into English from the Hindi word for “five” in the mid 1600s, as a traditional Indian punch always contained only five ingredients: some type of liquor, water, lemon juice, sugar and spices.

quarry

 

As the name of a hunted animal, quarry comes from a French word for “skin” or “leather”, “cuir”. As the name of a stone-works, it comes from the Latin “quadraria”, a place where rocks would literally be made cut into “quadria”, or “squares”.

raincheck

 

When baseball games in mid 19th century America were postponed due to bad weather, spectators would be given a ticket – a literal rain check – that allowed them to return to a future game for free.

samarium

 

It might not be the most well known of the elements, but samarium (used in the manufacture of certain magnets, including those in headphones) has secured its place in history as the first element named after a living person. Russian mining engineer Vasili Samarsky-Bykhovets granted scientists access to mines in Russia’s Ural Mountains where samarskite, the mineral from which samarium is obtained, was first discovered in the early 19th century.

treadmill

 

If you’re not a fan of the gym then it will come as no surprise that the original treadmill – a vast man-powered mill used to crush rocks – was invented as a hard-labour punishment for use in Victorian prisons. Oscar Wilde was famously made to work on one during his incarceration in Reading Gaol.

ultracrepidarian

 

The adjective “ultracrepidarian” describes anyone who comments on subjects outside of their own knowledge or expertise. It derives from a tale from Ancient Greece in which an Athenian shoemaker pointed out a mistake that Apelles, a renowned artist, had made in a drawing of a sandal in one of his artworks. Apelles gratefully corrected the error but when the shoemaker went on to point out another, Apelles sourly replied that a shoemaker should never give advice ultra crepidam – or “above the sandal”.

vampire

 

As well as being a blood-sucking monster, a vampire is also the name of a kind of theatrical trapdoor fitted above a spring-loaded platform that allows an actor to make a sudden appearance on stage. This vampire trap was invented for a production of a play called The Vampyre in the 1880s.

wellerism

 

“Adding insult to injury – as the parrot said when they not only took him from his native land, but made him talk the English langvidge arterwards” – or so says Sam Weller, Mr Pickwick’s Cockney manservant in Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Papers (1837). Renowned for twisting existing turns of phrase into ludicrous alternate versions of themselves, Dickens’ character inspired the word “wellerism” in the mid-1800s, referring to any similarly comically reworded expression.

chocolate

 

Chocolate doesn’t begin with X of course, but in its native Aztec “xocolatl” was the name of a bitter chocolatey drink made from the seeds of the cacao tree. It was brought back to England in the Middle Ages and became what we now know as chocolate today.

yonks

 

No one is quite sure where the word yonks comes from, but if not an amalgamation of “years, months and weeks”, it is probably a corruption of “donkey’s years”.

zed (or zee)

 

At one time both “zed” and “zee” – as well as “izzard”, “ezod” and “shard” – were used as names for the 26th letter of the alphabet in British English. It just so happens that “zed” stuck in Britain, while “zee” (a variation based on the “bee”, “cee”, “dee” pattern of the alphabet) found favour in America during the push for independence, when sounding as un-British as possible became the in thing.

 

Paul Anthony Jones is the author of Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons.

I’M KIDDING (by The Rosetta Foundation)

How to say “I’m kidding” in many languages

IMJUSTKIDDING

Thanks to @TheRosettaFound

Treccani: Italianismi in inglese: una storia infinita?

ITALIANISMI IN INGLESE: UNA STORIA INFINITA?

di Giovanni Iamartino*

Stupore e pregiudizio

“Inglese italianato, diavolo incarnato!”: ai molti insofferenti per la presenza, a proposito e a sproposito, di parole inglesi nell’italiano di oggi, forse non dispiacerà sapere che questo proverbio circolava tra i sudditi della regina Elisabetta Tudor – siamo nel secondo Cinquecento – per biasimare quei compatrioti che, non solo studiavano e facevano sfoggio della propria conoscenza della lingua italiana, ma si atteggiavano a imitatori del modello italiano nel comportamento e nella moda, nella letteratura e nella pittura, nelle pratiche commerciali e nell’arte di maneggiare la spada.
Si può quindi dire che, in un certo senso, questo proverbio riassuma in sé l’atteggiamento mentale che, non solo a quel tempo ma da allora in poi, ha caratterizzato il modo anglosassone di guardare all’Italia e alle cose italiane: ammirazione e disprezzo, accettazione e rifiuto, stupore e pregiudizio al tempo stesso.
Di tutto questo si trova ampia traccia ripercorrendo la storia dei rapporti anglo-italiani, che è fatta di commerci, di libri, di viaggi e – come non potrebbe essere diversamente? – di parole. In quanto segue sfoglieremo insieme le pagine di un ideale dizionario di parole italiane che, nel corso dei secoli, sono entrate nella lingua inglese, arricchendone il lessico e le possibilità espressive. Il peso di questo dizionario non riuscirà forse a raddrizzare quella bilancia che, sull’altro piatto, ha il gran numero di anglicismi in italiano; tuttavia, ci renderemo conto di non essere solo debitori e che, in ogni contatto tra lingue diverse (così come tra gli esseri umani) il dare si accompagna sempre al prendere, e viceversa.

Commerci in Lombard Street

Dare e prendere parole, dunque: un traffico, un commercio, che è una metafora appropriata, visto che i primissimi prestiti lessicali italiani nella lingua inglese sono d’ambito economico e finanziario: innanzitutto, LOMBARD oLOMBART, che viene usato nel Trecento in inglese con il generico significato di ‘commerciante’ (e ancora oggi c’è a Londra una Lombard Street); ma poi anche DUCAT, con riferimento a quel primo ducato d’oro voluto nel 1284 dal doge veneziano Giovanni Dandolo, moneta tanto nota e pregiata che il massimo poeta dell’Inghilterra medievale, Geoffrey Chaucer, può magnificare la Casa della Fama del suo omonimo poema affermando che essa è tutta rivestita d’oro “As fyn as ducat in Venyse”. E sempre Chaucer, funzionario di corte prima che eccelso poeta, trova nelle sue missioni commerciali e diplomatiche in Italia l’occasione per leggere le opere di Dante, Petrarca e Boccaccio e per proporre nelle proprie composizioni poetiche degli italianismi, come ad esempio “POEPLISSH appetit” che riproduce “appetito popolesco” dal Filostrato di Boccaccio. Se questo prestito non sopravvive in inglese, resteranno altri termini economici e commerciali, che vi entrano in quest’epoca dall’italiano anche se vengono attestati più tardi, e spesso attraverso la mediazione del francese: è il caso di BANKBANKRUPTCASH, e RISK che risalgono, in ultima istanza, all’italiano banca o bancobancarottacassa e rischio.

Un Rinascimento da restare di stucco 

Come si diceva all’inizio, la situazione muta radicalmente – per quantità e qualità degli italianismi in inglese – passando dal medioevo all’epoca moderna quando, nella seconda metà del Cinquecento, il Rinascimento italiano raggiunge l’Inghilterra. Attraverso lo studio della lingua italiana i gentiluomini e i cortigiani inglesi intendono accostare una civiltà superiore e realizzare l’ideale di perfezione dell’uomo rinascimentale, cosicché l’influsso linguistico è strettamente connesso a quello letterario e culturale, ed è facile esemplificare la presenza in inglese di italianismi negli ambiti dove l’Italia rinascimentale costituisce modello di eccellenza:

  • dal campo delle arti figurative e dell’architettura, GESSO, STUCCOCUPOLADUOMOBELVEDERE e PIAZZA;
  • dal campo della poesia, del canto e della musica, CANTOMADRIGALSONETTOSTANZADUO e VIOLIN;
  • dal mondo dell’attività militare e delle fortificazioni, IMBOSCATA e TO IMBOSKARSENAL e RIPARE;
  • dalle scienze della matematica e della geometria, ALGEBRASQUADRANT e SQUADRATURE;
  • dall’ambito del commercio e della finanza, BAZAARTO SALD (da saldare), TARIFF e TO INVEST.

Insomma, viene da dire che questi tecnicismi sono il lontano contraltare degli anglicismi dell’informatica e della finanza di cui oggi si riempiono la bocca molti dei nostri manager: costoro, forse, sarebbero un po’ più discreti e attenti all’uso della lingua italiana se sapessero che MANAGER è derivato da MANAGE, che è poi l’italiano cinquecentesco maneggio e maneggiare, cioè trattare e ammaestrare i cavalli! E poi, a differenza della situazione odierna, sono presenti e importanti nell’inglese rinascimentale molti italianismi che riflettono l’articolarsi dei rapporti sociali e le realtà personali, e dunque sono segno di un influsso culturale più sottile e profondo: troviamo così parole che alludono alle gerarchie sociali (MAGNIFICOMADONNA), a comportamenti positivi o più spesso negativi (BANDITBRAVOBORDELLO), a caratteristiche psicologiche o comportamentali (PEDANTE), a sentimenti ed emozioni personali (INAMORATODISTASTE, calco da disgusto), all’aspetto e alla condizione fisica dell’uomo (MUSTACHIO, da mostaccio, ‘baffo’; LAZARETTO). Non mancano poi richiami all’ambito della moda (MILLINER, da Milano / milanese, a indicare un venditore di articoli d’abbigliamento di provenienza milanese), del cibo e della cucina (ARTICHOKE, da articiocco, ‘carciofo’; MACARONI, da maccaroni / maccheroni) e, infine, del mondo naturale (ARCHIPELAGO, da arcipelagoTARANTULA).

La forza d’inerzia nel Seicento

Sebbene la varietà di questi (e molti altri) esempi documentino l’ampiezza dell’influsso italiano a cavallo tra XVI e XVII secolo, proprio in questi anni inizia a manifestarsi un desiderio di emancipazione da tale modello, anche per il coevo rafforzamento dell’identità politico-culturale dell’Inghilterra. Altri motivi, poi, portano il mondo inglese a voltare le spalle all’Italia: Carlo I Stuart (1625-1649) sposa una principessa francese, stringendo dei contatti dinastici e personali che si sarebbero rafforzati durante gli anni dell’esilio francese di Carlo II sino a fare della Francia, dalla Restaurazione degli Stuart in poi, il nuovo modello di ogni perfezione; l’intermezzo puritano del Commonwealth (1649-1660) non poteva certo guardare con favore l’Italia, aborrito centro focale del cattolicesimo e culla dell’immorale machiavellismo; infine, l’Italia del Seicento sperimenta un’oggettiva decadenza politica, sociale e culturale.
In tali condizioni sociopolitiche, lo studio della lingua italiana può sopravvivere solo in due casi: o come fatto isolato ed eccezionale, ed è quello del poeta John Milton; o se ne viene ridimensionata l’importanza culturale, come dimostra il fatto che l’italiano non è più la lingua dei cortigiani, ma diventa quella dei mercanti, o meglio di quei mercanti che, commerciando con il Vicino e il Medio Oriente, utilizzavano l’italiano come lingua franca per i propri traffici.
Pertanto, è a prima vista sorprendente che, nel corso del Seicento, entrino in inglese non pochi prestiti italiani; rispetto al Cinquecento, in alcuni ambiti – ad esempio la botanica e le scienze naturali, la matematica e la geometria, le fortificazioni – l’introduzione di italianismi diminuisce un poco, ma in altri si mantiene e in taluni casi addirittura aumenta:

  • non si interrompe il flusso di prestiti relativi alle armi: PISTOLETTOSTILETTOCAPITANO;
  • si ritrovano parole che definiscono comportamenti e atteggiamenti: AMOROSOBECCOCANAGLIACAPRICCIO,ESTROFURIOSOGENIOINCOGNITORUFFIANOVOLPONE; non mancano interiezioni quali CATSO! (dacazzo) o CRIMINE!;
  • dal mondo naturale: BERGAMOTGRANITOGROTTOLIBECCIOSCIROCCO e VOLCANO;
  • più numerosi di quelli cinquecenteschi sono i termini tecnici relativi all’architettura e alle arti figurative, anche per l’influsso di Inigo Jones (1573-1652) e di altri architetti inglesi che si ispirano al Palladio: GUGLIOOVOLO,PILASTRELANTICAMERABALCONYCAMPANILEPALAZZOPORTICOSTANZAVILLABUSTO,CHIAROSCUROINTAGLIOMEZZOTINTMINIATUREMORBIDEZZAPIETA’PROFILEPUTTOSCHIZZO;
  • rispetto al Cinquecento, più scarsi i prestiti d’ambito letterario, più numerosi quelli musicali: BURRATINE (daburattino), ENTRATALITERATI e LETTERATOPUNCHINELLOROMANZAROMANZOALLEGROBARITONE,CANTOCAPRICCIOLARGOPIANOPRESTORECITATIVERITORNELLOSONATATRILLVIOLINIST,VIVACE;
  • in aumento pure i prestiti relativi al commercio e alla finanza: CAMBIOTO DISCOUNT (da discontare, scontare),ENTRATEMONTE DI PIETA’PREMIO (cioè ‘premio di assicurazione’), LIRAPAOLOSCUDO;
  • più ricca di prestiti dall’italiano è anche la tavola seicentesca dove, per bevande e cibi, troviamo nomi di vini qualiGRECOLIATICO, oltre a BRENDICE (da brindesibrindisi), e nomi di cibi o piatti quali BROCCOLIFRITTADO (dafrittata), MORTADELLAPASTAPOLENTAVERMICELLI;
  • pure in aumento, infine, sono i prestiti relativi alla politica e alle controversie religiose: BULLETINCONSULTO,GIUNTAINTRIGOMANIFESTOPAPESSQUIETISM e QUIETISTRISGO(E) (da risigo o risico, ‘rischio’),SBIRROSCALDABANCO (‘predicatore focoso’), SPIRITATO (‘mosso da eccessivo zelo religioso’).

Molti di questi italianismi sono oggi arcaici od obsoleti, ma conta il peso della loro incidenza nel periodo considerato; se è poi vero che nel corso del Seicento gli inglesi vedono nella Francia e non più nell’Italia un modello culturale degno d’essere imitato, è altrettanto vero che la lingua francese fa in questo secolo da tramite per l’introduzione in inglese di prestiti italiani: ad esempio, TO ATTACK, BAGATELLE, BARRACK, CARTOONCHARLATANGAZETTE,MUSKETOON, RISK, SPINETVALISE e VEDETTE; infine, l’accoglimento seicentesco di italianismi, nonostante il superamento e per certi versi il rifiuto inglese dell’esperienza rinascimentale, ci dimostra che la corrente dell’influsso italiano avanza ancora per forza d’inerzia nonostante le nuove scelte politiche e culturali operate in Inghilterra.

Dal concerto grosso alla zampogna

Questa corrente si esaurisce definitivamente nel Settecento, quando gli inglesi sono ormai consapevoli di avere acquisito una sicura indipendenza culturale dai modelli stranieri, sia quello italiano sia quello francese. Tale indipendenza si traduce, nei confronti del mondo italiano, in atteggiamenti via via diversi: a un iniziale, totale rifiuto, come se gli inglesi si vergognassero di avere un tempo preso l’Italia a modello, segue una maggiore attenzione perché si cerca – come fanno i viaggiatori inglesi del Grand Tour – di vedere nelle rovine del presente le vestigia di un passato glorioso; infine, si sviluppa un rinnovato, seppure limitato apprezzamento, per l’opera in musica italiana e per il pittoresco dei paesaggi di artisti italiani quali Salvator Rosa. Musica e arte, dunque, molto meno lingua e letteratura; non sorprenderà pertanto il fatto che nel Settecento l’inglese accoglie un numero di italianismi nettamente inferiore rispetto ai secoli precedenti:

  • sono, ovviamente, in controtendenza – soprattutto nella prima metà del secolo – i termini relativi alla musica e al canto: ADAGIOALLEGRETTOANDANTEARIABALLATACASTRATOCONCERTO GROSSO,CONTRAPUNTISTCRESCENDODUETFAGOTTOFALSETTOFANTASIAFORTEFORTE-PIANO,FORTISSIMOLIBRETTOMEZZO-SOPRANOOPERETTAPIANISSIMOPRIMA DONNASERENATA,SINFONIASOLFEGGIOSOPRANOSTACCATOTENORETERZETTOTOCCATATUTTIVIOLA,VIOLONCELLOZAMPOGNA e ZUFOLO;
  • resistono i prestiti relativi all’architettura e alle arti figurative: LOGGIATERRENO (da (pian)terreno), TONDINO,STACCATURE (da stuccatura); ALFRESCOBAMBINOCINQUECENTOCONTORNOGUAZZOTO IMPASTE,IMPASTOPASTICCIOPORTFOLIORITRATTOSMALTO e TORSO;
  • si ritrovano alcuni prestiti che definiscono atteggiamenti o comportamenti personali e sociali, quali BRIO,CICISBEOCONVERSAZIONECON AMOREIMBROGLIOLAZZARONESOTTO VOCE e VILLEGGIATURA;
  • dagli ambiti della geologia e della zoologia provengono BRECCIALAVASOLFATARATERRA SIENNA (da terra di Siena), TUFA (da tufatufo), e VULCANIC;
  • come in ogni epoca non mancano prestiti riferiti a cibi e bevande: FINOCHIO (da finocchio), MARASCHINO,MINESTRASEMOLINA (da semolino) e STAFATA (da stufato).

In relazione al secolo diciottesimo, dunque, i dati linguistici a nostra disposizione confermano i dati storico-culturali: i prestiti lessicali dall’italiano non servono più a ridurre lo svantaggio linguistico e culturale dell’Inghilterra rispetto alle altre principali nazioni dell’Europa continentale; essi dimostrano piuttosto la capacità britannica di accogliere particolari, e universalmente condivisi, stimoli culturali (come nel caso del terminologia musicale e operistica) o fanno parte del normale ed equilibrato interscambio tra diverse comunità.

L’Ottocento in accelerando

E nell’Ottocento? Ugo Foscolo, rifugiatosi a Londra, scrive a proposito dell’italiano in Inghilterra che “Moltissimi lo studiano, pochi lo imparano, tutti affettano o presumono di saperlo; ma i librai assicurano che appena d’un libro italiano, anche classico, si vendono cinquanta copie in tre anni; e di un libro inglese, di qualche nome, se ne vendono cinque e spesso seimila copie in due o tre settimane”. L’interesse per la letteratura italiana è cosa elitaria, dei poeti romantici e vittoriani, e non può portare a un reale influsso interlinguistico; più superficiale ma per questo – paradossalmente – più efficace l’interesse degli inglesi che si appassionano all’italiano per accostare i testi operistici, o per orientarsi almeno un poco durante i viaggi e i soggiorni in Italia che tornano a essere frequenti dopo il crollo dell’impero napoleonico. Sta di fatto che gli italianismi accolti dalla lingua inglese nell’Ottocento sono moltissimi:

  • addirittura aumentano, rispetto al Settecento, i prestiti relativi alla musica e al canto: ACCELERANDOAGITATO, A CAPPELLAANDANTINOBASSET-HORN (a rendere corno di bassetto), BATTUTABEL CANTOCADENZA,CANTATRICECAVATINACEMBALOCONCERTINO,CORNETTO, CORNO, DIVADUETTINOFLAUTIST,FLAUTATOFUGATOFURIOSO, LAMENTOSO, LEGATO, MARCATO, MARTELLATO, MOSSOMUSICOOBOE D’AMORE, OBOE DA CACCIA, OCARINAORGANETTOPIANISTPIZZICATORALLENTANDOROMANZA,SCHERZOSESTETSFORZANDOSFORZATOSMORZANDOSMORZATOVIBRATO, VIOLA DA BRACCIO,VILLOTTA;
  • ancora numerosi i prestiti d’ambito artistico e architettonico: ABBOZZOAMORINO, BAROCCOCORTILE,GRADINOGRAFFITOINTARSIAINTONACO, LUNETTAMANDORLAREPLICASCENARIOSCUOLA,SEICENTISMOSEICENTISTSFUMATOSTUDIOTEMPERATEMPIETTOTENEBROSO, TERRIBILITA’,TONDO, TRECENTO;
  • in aumento quelli relativi a cibi e bevande: AGRODOLCECANNELLONIGNOCCHIGRISSINOLASAGNE,MARASCARAVIOLIRICOTTARISOTTOSALAMISEMOLASEMOLETTASPAGHETTISTRACCHINO,TAGLIATELLEZABAGLIONEZUCCAALEATICOCHIANTIGRAPPAGRIGNOLINOMALVASIAROSOLIO,VERNACCIA;
  • descrivono la realtà geofisica e naturale dell’Italia BECCACCIABOCCA (di vulcano), BORAFATA MORGANA,FIUMARALAPILLOMACIGNOMAREMMAOVER-MOUNTS (da oltramonti), RIVATERRA ROSSA,VOLCANELLO;
  • descrivono azioni, condizioni o atteggiamenti umani JETTATURAMAESTRIAMATTOIDREFASHIONMENT(modellato su rifacimento), SIMPATICOVENDETTA;
  • fanno riferimento alla situazione politica, sociale o religiosa dell’Italia ottocentesca BERSAGLIERECARABINIERE,CARBONARIIMBROGLIOIRRENDENTISTMAFIA e MAFIOSOMUNICIPIOQUIRINALRISORGIMENTO,SANFEDISTSINDACOTRIPLICEABBATECAPPAMANTELLETTATRIDUOZUCCHETTO;
  • e non mancano, infine, alcuni prestiti relativi ad ambiti minori quali la poesia (STORNELLOTERZINA), la festa (CONFETTIDOLCE FAR NIENTE), gli oggetti d’uso quotidiano (CREDENZAFIASCOPADELLA), le persone (COMMENDATORE, CONTESSA, DONZELLA, RAGAZZO).

Molti italianismi, dunque, e riconducibili a parecchi ambiti diversi: non certo la letteratura, che non è più il canale privilegiato per la trasmissione di prestiti italiani in inglese, ma ancora una presenza sostanziosa e significativa di italianismi nei consueti ambiti della musica, del canto, dell’arte e dell’architettura, dei cibi e delle bevande; non è più, invece, degno di nota l’accoglimento di prestiti relativi ai commerci e alla finanza. I molti prestiti descrivono realtà caratteristiche del mondo italiano, relative sia all’ambiente naturale sia alle istituzioni sociopolitiche, e sembrano essere introdotti in inglese per convogliarvi un certo ‘colore locale’ italiano, il più delle volte legato a una visione stereotipata e semplificata della realtà italiana.

Un’abbuffata di mozzarella cheese

Passando dall’Ottocento al secolo appena concluso, è innanzitutto evidente che la dinamica dei rapporti anglo-italiani è condizionata dal moltiplicarsi delle occasioni e delle modalità di contatto: i commerci e le relazioni internazionali, i viaggi di piacere e i flussi migratori, i mezzi di trasporto e quelli di comunicazione di massa favoriscono indubbiamente gli scambi linguistici, letterari e culturali; va però valutato caso per caso se tali contatti si possono tradurre in reali opportunità d’influsso interlinguistico. Così, sebbene l’italiano degli emigranti e quello insegnato nelle scuole dei paesi anglofoni abbiano costituito, nel corso del Novecento, un’occasione di contatto interlinguistico per centinaia di migliaia di parlanti, è legittimo ritenere che un effettivo influsso dell’italiano sull’inglese britannico e americano del XX secolo si sia esercitato soprattutto per altre vie, come dimostra la seguente elencazione di italianismi:

  • musica, canto e ballo: CODALAMENTOSINFONIA CONCERTANTESINFONIETTASOPRANINOSPINTO,STAGIONE (spesso STAGIONE LIRICA), STILE ANTICOSTILE CONCITATO;
  • arte e architettura: BOTTEGABOZZETTOFUTURISMGIOCONDAMODELLOPALIOTTOPENTIMENTO,RICORDOSEICENTOSETTECENTOSTUDIOLOVEDUTAVEDUTISTAVERISMOPIANO NOBILESALONE,SALOTTOSOTTOPORTICOTRAVATED (da travata), TRULLO;
  • realtà geofisica e naturale: MAESTRALEPONENTE (o PONENTE WIND), SALITASPINONE;
  • terminologia tecnico-scientifica: CHROMOCENTRE (da cromocentro), EQUICONTINUOUS (da egualmente continuo), FANGO FANGOTHERAPYFAVISMGIORGI (o GIORGI SYSTEM), HOLOGENESISISOTACTIC,OLIGOPODORTICANTRICCI (o RICCI TENSOR), ROSASITESECCHI (o SECCHI’S DISC), UREOTELIC, YOTTA(dal prefisso y- anteposto all’ital. otto, col significato di ‘10/24’);
  • terminologia tecnico-industriale: FERRO-CEMENTIMPASTOPUNTATERITALTERRAZZO;
  • religione: AGGIORNAMENTOPAPABILEQUARESIMAL, ROMANITA’;
  • economia e politica: BABY PENSIONS (calco di pensioni baby), BLACK JOB (calco di lavoro nero), BLACKSHIRT(calco di camicia nera), BOSSISMODESISTENZA(IL) DUCEEUROTAX o TAX FOR EUROPE (da Eurotassa),FASCIFASCISMGIOVANI IMPRENDITORIGOVERNISSIMO, GOVERNTMENT OF NATIONAL UNIT,GREENSHIRTS (calco di CAMICIE VERDI), HISTORIC COMPROMISE (da compromesso storico),LOTTIZZAZIONEMANI PULITE/SPORCHE  o i calchi CLEAN/DIRTY HANDSNORD-NAZIONEPADANIA ePADANIANSPADRONIPARTITOCRAZIAPOTERI FORTIRED BRIGADES (da Brigate Rosse), SACRO EGOISMOSALOTTO BUONOSCALA MOBILE, SQUADRASQUADRISTTANGENTITANGENTOPOLI o i calchiBRIBE CITYBRIBESVILLE KICKBACK CITYTRASFORMISMO, WHITE SEMESTER (da semestre bianco),UOMO DELLA PROVVIDENZA;
  • società: AGRITURISMO, ANIMALISTAANTI-MAFIABIENNALECAPO (o CAPO MAFIOSO), CAPO DEI CAPI o il calco BOSS OF BOSSESCADAVERI ECCELLENTICLOSED HOUSES (da case chiuse), COSA NOSTRA o OUR THINGCRAVATTARIDOLCE VITADONFERRAGOSTOGOOMBAH (corruzione gergale di compare che assume il significato di ‘mafioso’), MAFIAIST e MAFIAISM (costruiti sull’ital. mafia)e i composti MAFIA-BUSTINGMAFIA-FIGHTERSMAFIA-LINKEDMAFIA-RIDDEN e MAFIA-STYLEMAXI TRIAL (da maxi processo), MEN OF HONOUR (da uomini d’onore), OMERTA’PAPARAZZOPASSEGGIATAPASTICCERIAPENSIONEPIZZERIA,PRINCIPE, REPENTED (da (mafioso) pentito), RISTORANTE, SACRA CORONA UNITA, SCUGNIZZO,SETTIMANALI ROSA, SOVRINTENDENZA, TIFOSI, TOMBAROLO, VENTETTIST;
  • ruoli, comportamenti e atteggiamenti individuali e sociali: BIMBOFUROREJETTATOREMAMMISMONOIA,NUMERO UNOVITA NUOVA, VITELLONI;
  • cibi e bevande: ABBACCHIOAGNOLOTTIAL DENTEANTIPASTOARAGULA (nome dialettale per RUCOLA),BEL PAESEBRUSCHETTACACIUCCOCALABRESECALAMARICALZONECANNOLICAPRETTOCARBONE DOLCECARPACCIOCASSATACIABATTACORNETTOCOSTATA ALLA FIORENTINACROSTINI,FETTUCCINEFRITTATAFRITTO DI MARE o FRITTO MISTOFRITTURAFUSILLIGUANCIALELINGUINE,MACEDONIA DI FRUTTAMANICOTTIMARINARA (da alla marinara), MASCARPONE o MASCHERPONE,MOZZARELLA (o MOZZARELLA CHEESE), MOZZARELLA IN CARROZZAOSSO BUCOPANCETTAPANETTONE,PANFORTEPARMIGIANOPECORINOPENNEPESTOPEPPERONI (o PEPERONI), PINZIMONIOPIZZA,PORCHETTAPROSCIUTTO (o PROSCIUTTO HAM), PROVOLONERADICCHIORIGATONIROMANO (oROMANO CHEESE), SALTIMBOCCASANGUINACCIOSCALLOPINI (o SCALOPPINE), SCAMPISCUNGILLE(dall’italiano dialettale scunciglio), SPAGHETTI ALL’AMATRICIANA e ALLA CARBONARASPAGHETTINI,SPUMONI (da spumone), STELLINESTRACCIATELLATALEGGIOTIRAMISUTORTELLINIVITELLO TONNATO, ZABAGLIONEZEPPOLEZITONIZUCCHINIZUPPA, ZUPPA INGLESE e l’espressioneMMEDITERRANEAN DIETAMARETTOBERBERABAROLOCAPPUCCINODOLCETTO D’ALBAESPRESSO,FRASCATILAMBRUSCOLUNGO MACCHIATO (riferiti al caffè), MOSCATONEGRONIPROSECCOPUNT E MESRICCADONNASAMBUCASASSELLASOAVESPUMANTESTREGAVERDICCHIOVIN SANTO, VINO DA TAVOLA e il calco DENOMINATION OF PROTECTED ORIGIN;
  • casi vari: ARRIVEDERCIAUTOSTRADAAZZURRIBALLERINA (o BALLERINA SHOE), CANTINACIAO,FATTORIAFRECCE TRICOLORIGALLERIA (nel senso di ‘galleria di negozi’), GROSSO MODOLIBERO (tecnicismo del calcio), MANCIAMEZZOGIORNOMILLE MIGLIAPICCOLOPINOCCHIORIONESALUMERIA,SCOPASCUDETTOSCUOLA MEDIASCUSI(LA) SERENISSIMASPAGHETTI WESTERNSPREZZATURA,STRAMBOTTOSUFFIXOID (da suffissoide), TELEFONINO, VESPA.

Come si evince dall’esame di questi prestiti, la lingua inglese del XX secolo continua ad assumere dall’italiano un buon numero di termini musicali, artistici e tecnico-scientifici, oltre a parole relative a vari campi della realtà sociale e individuale. Meritano qualche osservazione particolare i prestiti tratti dagli ambiti dell’economia, della politica, della società e della cucina che, sebbene non manchino nei secoli precedenti, mostrano nel Novecento caratteristiche particolari: un certo numero di parole vengono accolte in inglese perché servono a definire con precisione aspetti del più o meno recente passato italiano (come DUCEFASCISM LA SERENISSIMA); altri termini indicano realtà tipicamente italiane, spesso negative (BLACK JOBCOSA NOSTRACRAVATTARI,LOTTIZZAZIONEMAMMISMOMANI PULITETANGENTOPOLITOMBAROLO), meno frequentemente positive o non connotate (ANIMALISTAFERRAGOSTOWHITE SEMESTER); abbondano nelle aree lessicali dell’economia e della politica i casuals, d’uso primariamente giornalistico, legati a fatti d’importanza solo contingente e con ben scarse probabilità di attestarsi definitivamente nella lingua inglese (come DESISTENZA, NORD-NAZIONE oUOMO DELLA PROVVIDENZA); i prestiti relativi a cibi e bevande – esportati dagli emigranti italiani, importati dai turisti e viaggiatori angloamericani o frutto della comunicazione pubblicitaria internazionale – sembrano essere i soli a non suscitare riserve o codificare stereotipi; al contrario, con la loro ricchezza e varietà (di alimenti, piatti e modalità di preparazione) indicano un campo in cui i prodotti italiani non temono rivali, come dimostra anche la grande diffusione, e spesso il declassamento a nomi comuni, di nomi commerciali quali PUNT E MES, RICCADONNA oNEGRONI.

Novecento: una dieta stretta

Così, dall’analisi di questi prestiti italiani nell’inglese novecentesco si può concludere che, con l’eccezione dell’ambito della ristorazione (quella raffinata praticata da cuochi italiani di grande nome tanto quanto quella più rustica, ma altrettanto alla moda, delle specialità regionali), non c’è reale incidenza lessicale dell’italiano nemmeno in quei settori – il design e l’architettura, la moda e il ‘made in Italy’, il cinema d’autore, il turismo culturale – in cui oggigiorno l’Italia primeggia a livello internazionale, di certo perché in tali realtà industriali la lingua d’uso è comunque l’inglese.
L’inglese oggi è la lingua che esprime l’ideologia e la cultura dominanti (o almeno quelle con la voce più potente), come l’italiano nel Rinascimento; l’inglese oggi è la lingua della comunicazione internazionale, come l’italiano seicentesco lingua franca nel Mediterraneo. A ciascuno di noi decidere se tale confronto storico può essere fonte di tranquillità o di preoccupazione per il presente e il futuro dei rapporti linguistici, letterari e culturali anglo-italiani.

*Giovanni Iamartino, ordinario di Storia della lingua inglese presso l’Università di Milano, si occupa da tempo della storia dei rapporti linguistici e culturali fra l’Italia e mondo inglese. Sugli italianismi in inglese ha pubblicatoLa contrastività italiano-inglese in prospettiva storica (in «Rassegna Italiana di Linguistica Applicata», vol. 33, 2001, pp. 7-130) e Non solo maccheroni, mafia e mamma mia!: tracce lessicali dell’influsso culturale italiano in Inghilterra (in L’inglese e le altre lingue europee. Studi sull’interferenza linguistica, a cura di Félix San Vicente, CLUEB, Bologna 2002, pp. 23-49).

In Treccani: http://www.treccani.it/magazine/lingua_italiana/speciali/nazioni/iamartino.html#.Uxi-onUoHSt.twitter