• #ProZCCA: Community Choice Awards 2015 hosted by ProZ •

Good morning, followers! Happy Sunday! 🙂
It’s been a long time since my last post – I know, I’m sorry! But, I’m juggling a lot lately, and I’m working on some new exciting projects that I’m going to unveil in a couple of months. I’m still working on my website (One Sec Translations), which you can visit and surf; but, I want to personalise it a little bit more, so I’m taking care of the latest details.

Besides, I’m arranging my business and networking trips to Bordeaux and Pisa (in September and October, respectively), so I’m trying to be active on many, different sides so that I’ll be ready to leave without freaking out! 😀
I’ll write something for you about it in a specific post on the topic. 🙂

Yet, although I didn’t make it at the Language Lover Contest 2015 hosted by Bab.la, it doesn’t mean I don’t have to give it another try by taking the chance to participate in the Community Choice Awards 2015 hosted by ProZ.

COMMUNITY CHOICE AWARDS 2015

The ProZ website says:

The ProZ.com community choice awards are hosted by ProZ.com annually to provide another means for the ProZ.com community to publicly recognize language professionals who are active, influential or otherwise outstanding in various media throughout the industry. Nominations, voting, and winners are determined entirely by the ProZ.com community.
Here’s how it works: the contest has a simple structure of nominations, voting, and announcement of winners. Members of the ProZ.com community are asked to submit their nominations in various categories. Nominees who receive a certain number of nominations move to the voting stage. Winners are determined purely through numbers of votes cast by the ProZ.com community.
There are two main categories: Translation-related and Interpretation-related. Within these categories are various sub-categories such as “best blog”, “best website”, “best trainer”, “best conference speaker”, etc.

Nominations are still being accepted. You can submit your nominations through August 18th following this web address >>> http://www.proz.com/community-choice-awards/nominations

If you like to spread the word on Twitter or other social media, you can use the hashtag #ProZCCA

If you feel like supporting me, you can fill in the blank spaces with my accounts and relating links as follows:

1. Blog
Claire’s Adventures in Translation, https://onesectranslation.wordpress.com
2. Website
One Sec Translations, https://www.onesec-translations.com
3. Twitter
Chiara Bartolozzi @OneSec_ts, https://twitter.com/OneSec_ts
4. Facebook Page
One Sec Translations, https://www.facebook.com/OnesecTranslationService
7. Other social media
Pinterest: Chiara One Sec (@chiaraonesec), https://it.pinterest.com/chiaraonesec/
Instagram: One Sec Translations (@onesectranslations), https://instagram.com/onesectranslations/
14. Blog post
Guest post: “Connecting with people” – The Importance of being Honest >>> http://caroltranslation.com/2015/03/03/guest-post-connecting-with-people/ (appeared on Caroline Alberoni‘s blog)
15. ProZ.com profile
Chiara Bartolozzi (One Sec Translations)http://www.proz.com/profile/1744283

You can also provide nominations for the other subcategories and nominate interpretation-related users.

You can fill in the blanks by writing as many names as you like; just choose the related category or subcategory and nominate your favourite people. Filling in all the spaces is not compulsory, so if you don’t have any nominees, just leave a blank space.

Thanks in advance for your support! 🙂
And have a look around, because many translators/interpreters/linguists are willing to take part in the competition!

Good luck, everyone!

~Chiara

Annunci

Honest Translators: l’approccio (pro)positivo

Buongiorno a tutti miei cari followers!

Oggi vi delizio con un post completamente in italiano, perché è il risultato di un proficuo scambio di idee avvenuto tra me e la mia amica, nonché collega, Clara di Winged Translations.

Come ho già avuto modo di scrivere nell’articolo “The importance of being Honest“, vorrei farmi portavoce di un movimento che ispiri ed unisca tutti i professionisti sotto un’unica bandiera: l’onestà.
Per ora questo progetto è in fase di definizione e pianificazione, ma credo che l’importanza di essere chiari, sinceri e, soprattutto, onesti su ciò che si è come individui e su cosa si possa offrire professionalmente sia la base per instaurare dei solidi rapporti umani e lavorativi.

Alla ricerca di ispirazione, ieri mi è capitato di imbattermi in un video di Marie Forleocome si può essere diretti con i colleghi senza risultare aggressivi, ma propositivi?

Parlando dell’argomento con Clara, ho selezionato una serie di riflessioni sull’approccio positivo di cui mi faccio promotrice e ho tratto alcune conclusioni personali che desidero condividere con voi.

Per riuscire ad ottenere un buon risultato, è bene:

▷ Focalizzarsi su un approccio propositivo;
▷ Non esagerare con la positività quando si cerca di motivare gli altri;
▷ Fornire sempre una modalità di risoluzione dei problemi, favorendo lo scambio di opinioni e il confronto;
▷ Spiegare il “come” si possa risolvere una problematica;
▷ Esprimere senza paura come ci si sente nei riguardi di una particolare situazione, perciò non in termini di “È colpa tua”, ma di “Mi sento così”.

Cosa ne pensate?
Ci sono altre accortezze da tenere a mente in situazioni in cui onestà e approccio diretto sono fondamentali?

Lasciatemi un commento, sarò felice di rispondervi.

~Chiara

Le fondamenta del movimento "Honest Translators"
Le fondamenta del movimento “Honest Translators”

[Repost] Ten Things You Must Never Do to Your Colleagues

by  on Sunday, February 23, 2014

Cf. original piece: http://najit.org/blog/?p=1793

Ten Things You Must Never Do to Your Colleagues


  1. Do not give advice freely, even if you think it would be helpful, unless you are specifically asked for it.  It is far better to just lend an ear. Most people just need a sounding board to express their thoughts and come to a decision about events in their lives, professional or otherwise.
  2. Do not refuse to share resources.  If you can help to make an assignment come off better with the product of your research, don’t hold back. It will make you look better to your colleague and the team better to the audience.  Remember that if your partner is not up to par for some reason, you will be judged together, not necessarily separately.  I am not, however, by any means condoning interpreters who consciously fail to do their part.
  3. Do not increase on-site drama by making unnecessary comments about the assignment, players, conditions, etc. If it’s a tough gig, you have enough on your hands without revving up the emotions, which will not improve anything  and only serve to put everyone more on edge.  Strive to put everyone at ease, focusing on the positive.
  4. Do not give work recommendations unless you are fully in agreement with doing so. Do not cave-in out of embarrassment.  It is better to blush once, if necessary,  than to have a permanent red face over possible fallout.
  5. Do not show off, either by hogging the microphone, speaking of past assignments, dropping names, etc. You don’t need to forcefully demonstrate how good you are.  Others will form their opinion of you based on your unaffected performance.
  6. Do not be late. There are very few, if any excuses in my book for this, and it speaks volumes about you both professionally and personally. You may be the best interpreter in the world but if I can’t count on you when I need you, it doesn’t matter.
  7. Do not show up unprepared. Even if you don’t have specific direction as to how to study for an assignment, there is always some generic research that can be done to help you navigate more easily through a difficult job. If you have a reputation for prepping, it will precede you favorably with both clients and colleagues.
  8. Do not gossip. Either about colleagues, clients or assignments.  There is absolutely no upside to this and you will be classified by others accordingly.
  9. Do not share personal information regarding clients, fees, payment practices & conditions. The scales of justice are not balanced on your shoulders.  Each professional needs to sort this out and you are not the arbiter.
  10. Do not force yourself into the lives of others, be it clients, colleagues or otherwise.  If you are interested in a relationship, put your best foot forward and show it but don’t overdo it. The Universe is at least as smart as we are and will choose who we should be with at any particular time for our own good. Remember that everything happens for a reason.

I look forward to  hearing about your own list of Don’ts and experiences in this regard.

[Repost] 21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand (by Maddi Lewis)

Previously shared on fb by ElleDi Traduzioni

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

Now, which language do I write this post in again…?posted on March 12, 2014 at 10:59am EDT

Maddi Lewis

COMMUNITY MEMBER

1. Needing a word in one language but only being able to think of it in the other.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“What’s the name of that little thing that lives in Australia? It’s ‘ornithorynque’ in French, what is it in English?”

2. Accidentally speaking the wrong language.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
Warner Brothers Pictures / Via theheartofcamelot.com

“Yes, do you have a question?”
“Oui, savez-vous où… sorry.”

3. Having to speak in one language after you haven’t used it in ages.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
Universal Pictures / Via prettyguilty.com

“I just came ba- oh, in French? Umm… Je, euh, je viens de passer mes vacances à, euh, c’est-à-dire en Australie où, euh, où j’ai vu un platyp- un ornithorynque.”

4. “Ooooh! Say something in [insert language here]!!!”

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
Buena Vista Pictures / Via herecomesjohnny.tumblr.com

Um, okay. “Va t’en, s’il te plaît.” GO AWAY.

5. “OMG! Teach me [insert language here]!”

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
NBC / Via mashable.com

Okay, do you have several years to spare? ‘Cause I sure don’t.

6. “Will you pleeeease do my [insert language here] homework? Since you’re an expert and all.”

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
BBC / Via giphy.com

A) No B) NO C) NO

7. Being the automatic translator whenever anything in your language is present: people, films, books, the translations of nutrition facts on food labels, etc…

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
MTV / Via rebloggy.com

Do you really need me to tell you that “hydrates de carbone” means “carbohydrates?” Is this really something you need reinforced?

8. Having people assume that, since you know one foreign language, you can therefore help them with any given language, no matter what it is.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
The CW / Via goodreads.com

“You need my help? Okay, well I don’t speak Spanish… No, it doesn’t matter than Spain and France are next to each other. The languages are not the same.”

9. Accidentally changing language mid-sentence.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“I saw this guy on Friday night, et il était le plus bel homme du monde, il était tellement magni- damn it, sorry.”

10. Autcorrect. Just, autocorrect.

Autcorrect. Just, autocorrect.

Screenshot / Via Maddi’s iPhone

OH MY GOD. ACTUALLY THE WORST.

This is what happens when you type English into a French keyboard. It’s mayhem.

11. Trying to tell really funny jokes from one language and having them fall flat because the humor gets lost in translation.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“It’s really funny, I swear it is! No, like, seriously! I promise!”

12. Thinking something through in one language and then having to say it in the other.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“Hold on, let me translate my thoughts real quick…”

13. Reading one language as if it were the other and being totally confused when it makes no sense.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
FOX / Via goodreads.com

“This is absolute gibberish!!… OH, it’s in English. Never mind.”

14. When you try to impress someone with your bilingualism but they couldn’t care less.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
Paramount Pictures / Via cjr.org

“Well, heyyy there! What’s your sign- or, should I say, quel est votre signe? Oh, not interested? That’s cool. Just walk away now.”

15. Anything to do with accents: sounding American when you speak your foreign language, sounding foreign when you speak English, getting accents mixed up, etc. It’s a struggle.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
NBC / Via stevencee.com

“Ah, crap- did I really just do a guttural ‘R?’ I’m not speaking French right now! What am I doing??”

16. When you visit wherever your “foreign” language is spoken and can’t understand a single word of any of the slang.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

It’s not the same between countries. Slang is not is universal.

17. When someone thinks they speak your language perfectly even though they only had, like, one semester of it in high school but they insist on using it anyways and it’s awful.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
NBC / Via gifrific.com

“Uh huh, what you just said actually makes no sense, and half of it was just American words said with an accent.”

18. Accidentally trying to use foreign words in Scrabble/Words with Friends.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“But it’s worth so many poooooiiinntttssss.” 😦 😦 😦

19. Getting grammar rules mixed up.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand
The Walt Disney Company / Via teen.com

The English sentence is ‘Oh yea, I saw him there when I bought that.’ In French, you say ‘Oui, je l’y ai vu quand je l’ai acheté.’ Direct translation? ‘Yes, I he there saw when I it bought.’ Now YOU try to not get that shit mixed up when switching languages.

20. Knowing the subtitles for foreign-language characters in films are horribly wrong.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“Yea, he didn’t just say ‘Put the money in the bag, bitch.’ He said, ‘Give me the duck and crackers, son.’”

21. IDIOMS. They never translate between languages, and languages don’t really share idioms.

21 Everyday Frustrations Bilinguals Will Understand

“Vous avez le cul bordé de nouilles?* Oh my god, are you okay? Oh… another damn idiom. Sorry.”

*This is a real idiom that literally means “to have an ass lined with noodles.” The idiomatic meaning? “To be lucky.” Yea, I don’t get it either.

Quote of the Day.

QOTD:

 

Translartisan
by Translartisan

Have a good weekend everyone!

Get inspired!

🙂

Idiots happen.

Story of my life.

idiots

I’m ready for you to hire me.

ecard_translators

#perlediunatraduttrice

P.S.: diffidate dalle imitazioni!

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS!!!

in #translators we trust. ♔
in #translators we trust. ♔