• September • [Positive things challenge]

Hello friends, followers and occasional guests!

September is here. It’s back. A brand new month started this morning, 30 days at our disposal to make our dreams come true.

It has been a rainy day and, being meteoropathic, I’ve been worked up for the whole day. I have a lot to work on and I’m trying to find a balance between what I’d like to achieve and what I can accomplish.

It’s a hard way to the top, but I can walk through it. I’m confident! 😉

September_welcome back
Hello September! Welcome back!

This post is not going to be long. I just want to share with you something I had been doing last week and I finished yesterday.

I carried out a nice challenge on facebook and I want to share it with you.

The challenge concerns the daily list of positive things happening for a week in your life. I’m going to copy and paste my week, so that I’ll have something to read in the future when I will feel dishearten or uninspired. 

“1. Day 1 of positive things:

1. This morning I went to the post office to pick up a parcel coming from China. It was the new hard cover for my mobile phone. I chose the picture, so right now I have a flawless Audrey Hepburn speaking on the phone printed on it ;
2. After coming back from holiday, my batteries are fully recharged and I feel positive and determined. It’s a very great feeling ; and
3. I’m working on different life-changing projects that are coming to life with a little help from inspiring, reliable, professional people. (I’m not going to tag you, so I hope you are reading between the lines. Yes, I’m talking to *YOU*! )

I challenge Sara and Elena to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same.
My friend Brenda gave me the chance to express my thoughts. Thank you, hun. You are special! 😉

“2. I apologise for the delay in writing out the day 2 of positive things. Let me briefly recap my three positive facts:

1. I had a Müller Mix yogurt for breakfast. Today’s choice: India. Delicious!;
2. This afternoon, I’m going to take the first step towards several new ideas I’d like to develop over the next months. I’m going to meet other professionals to talk those projects over; and
3. I’m still enjoying the great feeling coming from the good time I spent last weekend. I met a bunch of new, funny, interesting people and I also went shopping. What else? 😀

I challenge Clara and Sofia to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same.
Have a great day, girls! xx

“3. Day 3 of positive things:

1. Finally, this morning, the postman brought me a wonderful gift I bought for myself: Balance Your Words. Stepping in the translation industry (written and designed by my colleague Sara Colombo). I’m very curious and I can’t wait to start reading it. A big thank you to the lovely translator Valentina for her suggestion. I followed your advice! ;
2. I’ve just reconnected to my WiFi, which is a very good thing. I need the Internet to carry out research, but the connection is unstable. I’m already planning what to do in case I can’t retrieve it later. #nevermissaminute ; and
3. I’m having a cup of coffee in my #rainycup, and the smiley mascot printed on it makes me feel very happy.

As I mentioned you in my post, I challenge my e-friends Sara, Valentina and Valeria to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same.

“4. Day 4 of positive things:

1. This morning, my friend (and colleague) Sara and I received a new little translation assignment to complete by tomorrow morning. It was totally unexpected, because we were told by the client that there wasn’t any assignment ready for us. I’m going to proofread my part of the job, so it will be ready for the double-checking tomorrow ;
2. In the afternoon I took my sister Miriam shopping at the mall. We always have a lot of fun together. I do love to spend time with her (and she’s got a great taste in fashion. Indeed, she is my personal shopper) ; and
3. Since I love singing, I’d like to record a new cover song that I will upload on my online soundcloud channel. I hope to find some time for doing it.

As I promised (actually it looked like a threat, I’m sorry! ), I challenge my e-friends Emeline to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same.

“5. (Belated) Day 5 of positive things:

1. Received a phone call from one of my client for an urgent translation assignment and then lost it in 2 minutes (I’d just like to stress that it wasn’t my fault). Sounds like I broke my record! Last time it happened in about 30 minutes. XD *shit happens*;
2. The client has just sent an email closing it with “Happy weekend!” 😥 ; and
3. I’m going to carve out time to do my mani. I love nail polish!

I challenge my colleagues Jessica and Judit to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same. Enjoy the game!

“6. and 7. Day 6 and 7 of positive things:

1. I want to thank Brenda. She passed the baton to me, so I could start writing down my positives. I’m closing this challenge writing about her, and this is emblematic of the great circle of life. Thank you hun for helping me, and thank you so much for your words and support. I hope this could be the beginning of something bigger for both of us. ;
2. Today is Saint Julian’s Day. I went to the typical local Fair with my dear friend Marzia and I wandered about the stands, looking for something to buy (shopaholic mode ON), but the rain poured down on us so we went home earlier than expected; and
3. I feel lucky. Listing all these positive things I’ve found out I have a lot to smile about. I’m putting a lot of efforts in what I love the most, trying to achieve the goals I set for myself. I’m surrounded by wonderful people: my parents, my sister, my family, my partner, and my friends. Plus, I’m grateful for the support I get from my [new and long standing] colleagues and e-friends. I promise I’ll do my best. #keepgoing

Lastly, I want to finish the challenge asking my friend Fatima to list 3 positive things a day for 7 days, inviting at least one person each day to do the same. Love you, hun. Enjoy the game!”

I’m sure we all have something to be thankful for and people who believe in us and our talents. When we feel hopeless, we should just accept the challenge and redo the list. The answers to all our questions are inside ourselves. We just have to read them.

Good night!

~Chiara

Annunci

Chiuso per ferie • Gone on holiday/vacation • Estoy de vacaciones

Perfino il traduttore stacanovista ha bisogno di una piccola vacanza di tanto in tanto. Deve rimettere in ordine la confusione degli ultimi incarichi e riprendersi dopo aver ordinato tutti i file e catalogato le basi terminologiche ed i glossari. È tutto pronto! Fatture ed email inviate e telefonate agli ultimi clienti distratti fatte.

Anche il corpo ha bisogno del suo riposo, perciò questo è il momento di distendere la mente e lasciare che ogni muscolo si goda il meritato relax. 

Io sarò in viaggio per qualche giorno. Pubblicherò qualche foto e cercherò di utilizzare i social media per condividere qualche ricordo. 😉 Potete seguirmi su twitter o su facebook!

Nel frattempo auguro buon lavoro a chi sarà impegnato anche nelle prossime settimane e buone ferie a chi le farà in questi giorni come me o ne sta già godendo i benefici. 🙂

A presto.

 

~Chiara

 

Chiuso per ferie • Gone on holiday/vacation • Estoy de vacaciones
Chiuso per ferie • Gone on holiday/vacation • Estoy de vacaciones

[Repost] Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation (on Oxford Dictionaries)

Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation

 

King Alfred

Translation has been a crucial part of Anglophone culture from its very beginnings. The earliest English writers knew that the state of learning in England, with knowledge of Latin far from universal, meant a need for translations. Everything necessary for a rounded education was written in Latin, and so King Alfred the Great introduced a programme of translating “certain books, which are most needful for all men to know, into that language that we all can understand”. Alfred’s list of necessary books was very specific, and encompassed classics of theology and philosophy, rather than the Greek and Roman classics which were to torture school boys nearly a millennium later. These poor beleaguered boys, struggling with their Homer and Virgil, would often use a crib, a translation that provided them with illegitimate help in their studies. This might also be called a cabbage in the school slang of the nineteenth century; nobody’s sure where the term comes from, though it might be that the strips of paper looked like strips of cloth which tailors rolled up into shapes resembling cabbages (etymologies can be a bit labyrinthine at times!).

Like most linguistic concepts, translation has been described using a wide range of words. Here are some notes on five of my favourites.

Translate

Let’s start with the basics! The verb translate goes back to at least the early thirteen hundreds, when the author of the religious poem Cursor Mundi tells his readers that:

Þis ilk bok es translate into Inglis tong

to rede for the love of Inglis lede,

(This book is translated into the English language as advice, for the love of the English people.)

Translation was an important art in the medieval period, perhaps even more so than in King Alfred’s day, since the people of England now had to deal with both Latin and Norman French as commonly-used languages as well as the English vernacular. The verb comes from the Latin translatus, the past participle of transferre, meaning “to transfer”, hence the use of translate to refer to physical transferral. It‘s often used to describe the moving of a saint’s remains to a new resting place.

Paraphrase

The mythic first poem in English, Caedmon’s Hymn, was a paraphrase. Legend has it that Caedmon, a simple cowherd in the monastery at Whitby, was visited by an angel who inspired him to compose poems on scriptural themes. The Latin scripture would be read to him, and he would produce beautiful paraphrases in the intricate Old English verse form. The verbparaphrase, however, comes a long time after Caedmon: the Oxford English Dictionary’s first evidence is from 1593 (the noun is attested a little earlier). It comes, via French and Latin, from a Greek root: para (“alongside”) and phrasis (“diction, speech”). So, whereas to translate is to transfer from one language to the other, to paraphrase is to speak in the new language alongside the original.

Englify

The delightful verb Englify was first used, according to the OED’s evidence, in 1688, when the writer Randle Holme referred to “a Welsh name Englified”. It is one of a set of words describing translation into English. Englishizeappears around a hundred years later, not long after anglicize was first used in this sense (in 1711 according to current research), whereas the simple verb English is the earliest of the trio, first appearing in the Wycliffite translation of the Bible in the 1400s: “I Englishe it thus”, the translator tells us. Other language names have been used in the same way: in 1868, Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote that “We clothe the nude word by Frenching it”, andFrenchize has also been used for translation into French.

Traduce

Coming from the Latin traducere, meaning “to bring across” or “to transfer”,traduce was used to mean “translate” from at least the fifteen hundreds, and was still in use when Charles Kingsley wrote his novel Alton Locke in 1850: the title character will be allowed no more books to read “If ye canna traduce to me a page o’ Virgil”, so the Scotsman Sandy Mackaye threatens him. The verb is related to words for “translation” in a number of Romance languages: French traduction and Italian traduzzione, for example. The more common sense of traduce now is to slander or disgrace a person. It seems a bit of a leap from “transfer” to “slander”, but the classical Latin traducere could also mean “to lead along (as a spectacle)”, as one might do to a criminal, and in later Latin it carried the sense “to lead astray”, “to corrupt”, and “to blame”. It’s a verb of many talents, and it seems quite fitting that a word for translation should itself have such a variety of possible translations.

Wend

This is my favourite translation verb, and the oldest of our five. Indeed, this meaning of the word seems to have died out in the twelve hundreds, remembered now only by students of Old English who read King Alfred’s accounts of his efforts at translation: “Ða ongan ic..ða boc wendan on Englisc”; “Then I began to translate that book into English”. The range of meanings that wend had even in those days tells us something about how the Anglo-Saxons thought about translation. It could mean altering your course, changing your mind, travelling, or taking the final journey of death. Translation was a slippery thing, and it could fatally change the meaning of the original text unless great care was taken by a skilful translator.

These are just a few of the many verbs that are or have been used for translation; there was no space to talk about convertrenderinterpret, orthrow, to name just a few. Dub also lost out in my list of five, though it has the neatest etymology, being a simple shortening of the word double. So there is still plenty to explore in the world of translation; but, for now, I shall wend my way.

Cf. original: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2013/10/five-ways-to-talk-about-translation/#.U117FOTRzCU.twitter (previously shared by TransGALAtor)

[Repost] If You’ve Never Used These English Idioms, You’re Probably Not a Native English Speaker (by Lana Winter Hébert)

If You’ve Never Used These English Idioms, You’re Probably Not a Native English Speaker

LEISURE LIFESTYLE OCTOBER 9 BY 

 Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives. They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. Here’s a list of 20 that you’re likely to come across fairly often:

1. A Chip on Your Shoulder

No, this doesn’t mean that you’ve dropped part of your snack. To have a chip on one’s shoulder implies that the person is carrying around some grudge or bad feelings about something that happened in the past… like having walked through the wreckage of a building, and ended up with a chip of that building stuck to them for years afterward.

2. Bite Off More Than You Can Chew

Like taking a HUGE bite of a sandwich that will fill your mouth up so much that you can’t move your jaw, this idiom implies that you’ve taken on more than you can handle successfully. An example would be agreeing to build ten websites in a week when normally you can only handle five.

3. You Can’t Take It With You

You can’t take anything with you when you die, so don’t bother hoarding your stuff or not using it except for “special occasions”. Live now, because all your stuff is going to be around long after you’re gone.

4. Everything But the Kitchen Sink

This implies that nearly everything has been packed/taken/removed. For instance, if someone said: “The thieves stole everything but the kitchen sink!” it meant that they took everything they could carry; it’s damned hard to remove a sink and carry it around.

5. “Over My Dead Body”

When the only way you’ll allow something to happen is if you’re no longer alive to stop it.

6. Tie the Knot

To get married. This is left over from the old tradition of handfasting, wherein the hands of the bride and groom would be tied together with a length of ribbon to symbolize that their lives were fastened together permanently.

7. Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover

Things aren’t always what they appear to be at first glance, so it’s a good idea to give something a chance, even if its outward appearance isn’t immediately attractive.

*The exception to this might be actual books that have hideous covers: those tend to be terrible all around, and in cases such as these, it’s best to contact the author or publisher and recommend a good graphic designer.

8. When Pigs Fly

This means “never”. Pigs aren’t about to sprout wings and take flight anytime soon, so if someone says to their kid that they can get a forehead tattoo when pigs fly, it’s not gonna happen.

9. A Leopard Can’t Change His Spots

Basically: you are who you are. Just like a leopard can’t concentrate really hard and change the pattern on its skin, people can’t change who they really are at heart.

10. Wear Your Heart on Your Sleeve

To freely show and express all of your emotions, as though your heart were on the outside of your body.

11. Bite Your Tongue!

Stick your tongue between your teeth (gently), and then try to speak. You can’t say a word, can you? To bite one’s tongue means to stay quiet: literally to hold the tongue still so it can’t make a sound. This goes along with:

12. Put a Sock In It

The idea behind this is that if you stuffed a sock in your mouth, you’d be quiet… so if you tell someone to “put a sock in it”, you’re telling them to shut up.

13. Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

If a couple of dogs had been fighting and are now sleeping peacefully, it’s best to just leave them alone. The idea behind this one is to avoid bringing up old arguments so they’ll just be argued about again.

14. Foam at the Mouth

To hiss and snarl in anger like a rabid dog (whose mouth would be foamy as he jumps around like crazy and tries to bite people).

15. A Slap on the Wrist

A very, very mild punishment. To be slapped on the wrist doesn’t hurt much, and isn’t a deterrent from misbehaving again.

16. You Are What You Eat

This is the idea that everything you eat influences your health and well-being. If you eat nothing but junk food, you’ll end up unhealthy and malnourished, so be sure to eat a well-balanced diet.

17. “It’s a Piece of Cake!”

…meaning that it’s incredibly easy. No-one has a difficult time eating a piece of cake, do they?

18. It Takes Two to Tango

A person can’t dance the tango alone, nor can they fight by themselves either. If an argument has occurred, there were two people involved, so two were responsible.

19. Head Over Heels

To be incredibly excited and joyful, particularly with regard to being in love. Imagine someone so happy that they do cartwheels down the street: like that.

20. An Arm and a Leg

When something is so ridiculously expensive that you might have to sell your own body parts in order to afford it, it’s said to cost “an arm and a leg”.

Featured photo credit: Opened book with letters flying out of it on bright background via Shutterstock

[Repost] 11 Confusing Words and Common Errors

11 Confusing Words and Common Errors

in Confusing WordsVocabulary

Confusing Vocabulary Words in English

Image source: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

#6 – Meet / Know

Don’t say: “I knew him last year.”

Say: “I met him last year.”

Meet has two meanings:

  • When you have first contact with a person
    “I met him last year”
  • When you will encounter someone you already know. In this case, we often use “meet with” or “meet up with”
    “I’m meeting up with some friends at the bar after work.”

Know has two different meanings/uses:

  • With knowledge and skills in general
    “He knows everything about computers.”
  • With knowing people in general
    “Do you know Janet? She’s in the advanced English class.”
    “No, I don’t think I know her.”

#28 – Wait / Hope / Expect

Don’t say: “I’m waiting my friend to call.”

Say: “I’m waiting for my friend to call.”

Wait = Pass the time until something happens

  • It’s 6:45. I’m waiting for the 7:00 bus.
  • We waited in line for three hours to get tickets to the concert.
  • You need to wait for the computer to finish updating.

Don’t confuse “wait” with hope and expect:

Hope = Want something to happen

  • hope I’ll get a promotion this year!
  • I’m sorry to hear you’re sick. I hope you get better soon!
  • The traffic is very bad today. I hope I won’t be late.

Expect = Believe that something probably will happen.

  • We’re expecting a visit from some clients – they said they would come at 4:30.
  • My boss expects me to arrive on time every day.

#40 – Before / Ago / Back

Don’t say: “I sent the letter two months before.”

Say: “I sent the letter two months ago.”

Or: “I sent the letter two months back.” (informal)

Ago and back are used for past times from the present moment. Before is used for past times from another time in the past. Here are some examples of before:

  • Yesterday I missed my train. I got to the train station at 7:10, but the train had left ten minutes before.
  • I was very happy when I got this job last year, because I had lost my previous job six months before.

#92 – Raise / rise / arise

Don’t say: “The government is going to rise taxes.”

Say: “The government is going to raise taxes.”

Rise means “to go up” or “to increase” – by itself. There is only a subject; there is no object.

  • The sun rises at 6:00 AM.
  • Energy consumption rose 20% this year.

Raise means “to move something to a higher position” or “to increase something,” so there are two entities, the subject (which performs the action) and the object (the thing that is moved or increased):

  • raised my hand to answer the teacher’s question.
    (subject = I; object = my hand)
  • The state is raising the minimum age to get a driver’s license – from 16 to 18.
    (subject = the state; object = the minimum age to get a driver’s license)

Raise can also be used in a more metaphorical sense:

  • He raised some objections to the project proposal.
    (= he expressed the objections)
  • Our baseball team raised money for a local orphanage.
    (= collected money from donations)
  • My parents raised their voices during the argument.
    (= spoke louder)
  • The college is raising the bar for new applicants.
    (= increasing the standards)

Arise is similar to rise, but is more formal and abstract. It can also be used to mean “appear” or “result from”:

  • Several important questions arose during the meeting.
  • I’d like to work in Japan, if the opportunity arises.
  • A new spirit of hope has arisen among the country’s people.
  • Sorry, I’ll need to cancel our appointment. A few problems have arisen.

 

– See more at: http://espressoeng.staging.wpengine.com/english-vocabulary-11-confusing-words-and-common-errors/#sthash.gNZXyAfa.IFJ9UiSr.dpuf

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