• #ProZCCA: Community Choice Awards 2015 hosted by ProZ •

Good morning, followers! Happy Sunday! 🙂
It’s been a long time since my last post – I know, I’m sorry! But, I’m juggling a lot lately, and I’m working on some new exciting projects that I’m going to unveil in a couple of months. I’m still working on my website (One Sec Translations), which you can visit and surf; but, I want to personalise it a little bit more, so I’m taking care of the latest details.

Besides, I’m arranging my business and networking trips to Bordeaux and Pisa (in September and October, respectively), so I’m trying to be active on many, different sides so that I’ll be ready to leave without freaking out! 😀
I’ll write something for you about it in a specific post on the topic. 🙂

Yet, although I didn’t make it at the Language Lover Contest 2015 hosted by Bab.la, it doesn’t mean I don’t have to give it another try by taking the chance to participate in the Community Choice Awards 2015 hosted by ProZ.

COMMUNITY CHOICE AWARDS 2015

The ProZ website says:

The ProZ.com community choice awards are hosted by ProZ.com annually to provide another means for the ProZ.com community to publicly recognize language professionals who are active, influential or otherwise outstanding in various media throughout the industry. Nominations, voting, and winners are determined entirely by the ProZ.com community.
Here’s how it works: the contest has a simple structure of nominations, voting, and announcement of winners. Members of the ProZ.com community are asked to submit their nominations in various categories. Nominees who receive a certain number of nominations move to the voting stage. Winners are determined purely through numbers of votes cast by the ProZ.com community.
There are two main categories: Translation-related and Interpretation-related. Within these categories are various sub-categories such as “best blog”, “best website”, “best trainer”, “best conference speaker”, etc.

Nominations are still being accepted. You can submit your nominations through August 18th following this web address >>> http://www.proz.com/community-choice-awards/nominations

If you like to spread the word on Twitter or other social media, you can use the hashtag #ProZCCA

If you feel like supporting me, you can fill in the blank spaces with my accounts and relating links as follows:

1. Blog
Claire’s Adventures in Translation, https://onesectranslation.wordpress.com
2. Website
One Sec Translations, https://www.onesec-translations.com
3. Twitter
Chiara Bartolozzi @OneSec_ts, https://twitter.com/OneSec_ts
4. Facebook Page
One Sec Translations, https://www.facebook.com/OnesecTranslationService
7. Other social media
Pinterest: Chiara One Sec (@chiaraonesec), https://it.pinterest.com/chiaraonesec/
Instagram: One Sec Translations (@onesectranslations), https://instagram.com/onesectranslations/
14. Blog post
Guest post: “Connecting with people” – The Importance of being Honest >>> http://caroltranslation.com/2015/03/03/guest-post-connecting-with-people/ (appeared on Caroline Alberoni‘s blog)
15. ProZ.com profile
Chiara Bartolozzi (One Sec Translations)http://www.proz.com/profile/1744283

You can also provide nominations for the other subcategories and nominate interpretation-related users.

You can fill in the blanks by writing as many names as you like; just choose the related category or subcategory and nominate your favourite people. Filling in all the spaces is not compulsory, so if you don’t have any nominees, just leave a blank space.

Thanks in advance for your support! 🙂
And have a look around, because many translators/interpreters/linguists are willing to take part in the competition!

Good luck, everyone!

~Chiara

Annunci

• #TLL2015 – Favourite Language Lovers Contest •

THANK YOU SO MUCH! :))
THANK YOU SO MUCH! :))

#‎TLL2015‬
I’ve been nominated among your favourite language lovers! I didn’t expect it, so thank you so much! 🙂

But, now, it’s up to you!

Please, vote for my facebook page ▷ One Sec Translations ◃ in the category “Top 100 Language Facebook Pages 2015” (here ➡ http://en.bab.la/…/top-100-language-facebook-pages-2015-vot…) and my twitter account ▷ One Sec (Chiara) ◃ in the category “Top 100 Language Twitter Accounts 2015” (here ➡ http://en.bab.la/ne…/top-100-language-twitterers-2015-voting).
It’s a one shot, you can only vote once for each category.

Check the other categories (Language Learning Blogs, Language Professionals Blogs, and YouTube Channels) to vote your favourite people!

Game on!

***

Top Language Lovers 2015 || Lexiophiles | bab.la
Top Language Lovers 2015 || Lexiophiles | bab.la
Vote for my facebook page!
Vote for my facebook page!
Vote for my twitter account!
Vote for my twitter account!

***
#TLL2015
Ho ottenuto due nomination al concorso bab.la + Lexiophiles e appaio tra gli amanti della lingua preferiti dagli utenti! Non me lo aspettavo davvero, grazie mille a tutti!

Ora, però, tocca a voi!

Se vi piace la mia pagina facebook ▷ One Sec Translations ◃ la categoria in cui potete votarmi è “Top 100 Language Facebook Pages 2015” (cliccate qui http://en.bab.la/…/top-100-language-facebook-pages-2015… )
e per il mio account di twitter ▷ One Sec (Chiara) ◃ la categoria è “Top 100 Language Twitter Accounts 2015” (cliccate qui http://en.bab.la/…/top-100-language-twitterers-2015-voting ).

Potete esprimere la vostra preferenza una sola volta, quindi anche ricaricando la pagina e cliccando insistentemente verrà conteggiato un solo voto.

Date uno sguardo anche alle altre categorie (Language Learning Blogs, Language Professionals Blogs, and YouTube Channels) e votate i vostri link preferiti!

Che il voto abbia inizio! 😉

Nominate - Vote - Award
Nominate – Vote – Award

“Taking the Plunge: Immersion programs help children learn other languages”

Good morning, readers!

Today, I want to share with you a very interesting Infographic that Priscilla Brown from Early Childhood Education Degrees asked me to publish on my blog.

This is their blog. —> http://www.early-childhood-education-degrees.com/blog/ Have a look!
Immersion Programs
Source: Early-Childhood-Education-Degrees.com/
Early Childhood Education Degrees

Free People Search Infographic: Many Languages One America

I checked my inbox this morning, and I found a kind email by Heather Brown.
She asked me to repost this infographic. I found it very interesting, because it shows data resulting from a study carried out in the fields of language and linguistics in relation to the United States of America being a “Great Melting Pot”.

It is divided into sections concerning which languages and dialects are spoken, where such languages are spoken, which fields involve those languages , and the multilanguage attitude in the USA.

Have a look! 🙂

Cf. http://freepeoplesearch.org/blog/infographic-many-languages-one-america.html

Many languages,one americaan infographic from FreePeopleSearch.org

 

[Repost] Social Media Has Ruined Grammar (And Other Elementary School Skills You No Longer Need) (by Andrea Greb)

Social Media Has Ruined Grammar (And Other Elementary School Skills You No Longer Need)

Andrea Greb

So in news that makes me embarrassed to be both an English speaker and a Twitter user, adorable Brazilian schoolchildren are correcting the grammar in celebrity tweets as a way of improving their own English skills.  Also, they’re ridiculously polite when they do this.  Celebrities, please take note and learn both grammar and manners.

While this is an awesome exercise in both learning about punctuation and proofreading for these students, it also raises some questions – if you can be a multimillionaire with no demonstrated command of the English language, are there other skills we’re being taught in elementary school that have been rendered obsolete by the digital age?

Spelling

So I’m going to date myself by saying this (I’m old, guys), but in my youth, word processing software didn’t have spellcheck.  If you didn’t know how to spell a word, you had to look it up in the dictionary, which is this giant book (a predecessor to dictionary.com) that listed all of the words.  I have gleaned from my friends who are teachers that spelling tests are still a thing, and I know spelling bees are alive and well, but there’s something about the fact that kids can just spellcheck their papers now instead of having to proofread for actual typos.  How long before they’re just dictating their essays to Siri?

Cursive

On the subject of writing, how relevant is penmanship anymore?  I have fond memories of that paper that had lines like a traffic light so you knew where to start and end your letters, and less fond memories of the hand cramps that followed writing an entire essay test in cursive.  I was relieved to learn that apparently most students are still learning cursive, presumably mostly so that they can establish a signature that will devolve into an illegible scrawl.  When more and more of our communication is just taking place on a screen and not even on paper, should we be learning cursive at all, or would time spent learning that be better used catching our math and science skills up to the rest of the world?

Arithmetic

Then again, who needs math skills when we’re all carrying around phones that function perfectly well as calculators?  I recently learned that a friend who’s my age (an age I promise isn’t 50) used to take an actual abacus to school.  I was actually impressed, and a little jealous that he knows how to use an abacus.  I can barely remember where my calculator is, and heaven help me if I ever have to actually use it.  97% of the math I do is done in Excel, and the other 3% is calculating tips, which I do in my head, but I’m pretty sure there’s an app for that.

Telling time

I have a friend who actually cannot tell time using a regular clock – she had the chicken pox when it was covered in school, cheated on the test, and subsequently never learned.  It seems like most clocks are digital these days; is there really value anymore in learning all this hour hand and minute hand nonsense?  Do people even wear watches to tell time anymore, or do kids just think they’re fun fashion accessories with numbers on them?

Making friends

One of the most important lessons of elementary school was learning how to interact with other kids – not fighting over toys, forming friendships based on your shared love of Anastasia Krupnik books, realizing that boys have cooties.  Here’s the thing, though.  Talking to other kids is hard, and scary.  So we can just skip that bit and be friends with people on the internet, based on some selfies and perceived shared interests.

Basically, what I’m suggesting is that we overhaul our whole elementary education system and focus on the skills these kids are going to need to be successful:  InstagramTumblr, and a willingness to humiliate themselves on reality television in exchange for money.  (Relax, Millenial-fearers, I’m kidding).  The point of technology isn’t to avoid using our brains, it’s just a shortcut to be used after we’ve learned the real skills behind it, so we can spend our time doing really important things like protesting t-shirts that are maybe mean to Taylor Swift.  That said, I do remember when things like “computers” and “typing” were elective classes, and not essential skills required to succeed, so I am curious to see what elementary school will look like by the time I have kids.

 Featured image via 

Cf. original: http://hellogiggles.com/social-media-has-ruined-grammar-and-other-elementary-school-skills-you-no-longer-need

[Repost] Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation (on Oxford Dictionaries)

Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation

 

King Alfred

Translation has been a crucial part of Anglophone culture from its very beginnings. The earliest English writers knew that the state of learning in England, with knowledge of Latin far from universal, meant a need for translations. Everything necessary for a rounded education was written in Latin, and so King Alfred the Great introduced a programme of translating “certain books, which are most needful for all men to know, into that language that we all can understand”. Alfred’s list of necessary books was very specific, and encompassed classics of theology and philosophy, rather than the Greek and Roman classics which were to torture school boys nearly a millennium later. These poor beleaguered boys, struggling with their Homer and Virgil, would often use a crib, a translation that provided them with illegitimate help in their studies. This might also be called a cabbage in the school slang of the nineteenth century; nobody’s sure where the term comes from, though it might be that the strips of paper looked like strips of cloth which tailors rolled up into shapes resembling cabbages (etymologies can be a bit labyrinthine at times!).

Like most linguistic concepts, translation has been described using a wide range of words. Here are some notes on five of my favourites.

Translate

Let’s start with the basics! The verb translate goes back to at least the early thirteen hundreds, when the author of the religious poem Cursor Mundi tells his readers that:

Þis ilk bok es translate into Inglis tong

to rede for the love of Inglis lede,

(This book is translated into the English language as advice, for the love of the English people.)

Translation was an important art in the medieval period, perhaps even more so than in King Alfred’s day, since the people of England now had to deal with both Latin and Norman French as commonly-used languages as well as the English vernacular. The verb comes from the Latin translatus, the past participle of transferre, meaning “to transfer”, hence the use of translate to refer to physical transferral. It‘s often used to describe the moving of a saint’s remains to a new resting place.

Paraphrase

The mythic first poem in English, Caedmon’s Hymn, was a paraphrase. Legend has it that Caedmon, a simple cowherd in the monastery at Whitby, was visited by an angel who inspired him to compose poems on scriptural themes. The Latin scripture would be read to him, and he would produce beautiful paraphrases in the intricate Old English verse form. The verbparaphrase, however, comes a long time after Caedmon: the Oxford English Dictionary’s first evidence is from 1593 (the noun is attested a little earlier). It comes, via French and Latin, from a Greek root: para (“alongside”) and phrasis (“diction, speech”). So, whereas to translate is to transfer from one language to the other, to paraphrase is to speak in the new language alongside the original.

Englify

The delightful verb Englify was first used, according to the OED’s evidence, in 1688, when the writer Randle Holme referred to “a Welsh name Englified”. It is one of a set of words describing translation into English. Englishizeappears around a hundred years later, not long after anglicize was first used in this sense (in 1711 according to current research), whereas the simple verb English is the earliest of the trio, first appearing in the Wycliffite translation of the Bible in the 1400s: “I Englishe it thus”, the translator tells us. Other language names have been used in the same way: in 1868, Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote that “We clothe the nude word by Frenching it”, andFrenchize has also been used for translation into French.

Traduce

Coming from the Latin traducere, meaning “to bring across” or “to transfer”,traduce was used to mean “translate” from at least the fifteen hundreds, and was still in use when Charles Kingsley wrote his novel Alton Locke in 1850: the title character will be allowed no more books to read “If ye canna traduce to me a page o’ Virgil”, so the Scotsman Sandy Mackaye threatens him. The verb is related to words for “translation” in a number of Romance languages: French traduction and Italian traduzzione, for example. The more common sense of traduce now is to slander or disgrace a person. It seems a bit of a leap from “transfer” to “slander”, but the classical Latin traducere could also mean “to lead along (as a spectacle)”, as one might do to a criminal, and in later Latin it carried the sense “to lead astray”, “to corrupt”, and “to blame”. It’s a verb of many talents, and it seems quite fitting that a word for translation should itself have such a variety of possible translations.

Wend

This is my favourite translation verb, and the oldest of our five. Indeed, this meaning of the word seems to have died out in the twelve hundreds, remembered now only by students of Old English who read King Alfred’s accounts of his efforts at translation: “Ða ongan ic..ða boc wendan on Englisc”; “Then I began to translate that book into English”. The range of meanings that wend had even in those days tells us something about how the Anglo-Saxons thought about translation. It could mean altering your course, changing your mind, travelling, or taking the final journey of death. Translation was a slippery thing, and it could fatally change the meaning of the original text unless great care was taken by a skilful translator.

These are just a few of the many verbs that are or have been used for translation; there was no space to talk about convertrenderinterpret, orthrow, to name just a few. Dub also lost out in my list of five, though it has the neatest etymology, being a simple shortening of the word double. So there is still plenty to explore in the world of translation; but, for now, I shall wend my way.

Cf. original: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2013/10/five-ways-to-talk-about-translation/#.U117FOTRzCU.twitter (previously shared by TransGALAtor)

[Repost] Multilinguals Have Multiple Personalities (by Alice Robb)

LANGUAGE – APRIL 23, 2014

Multilinguals Have Multiple Personalities

Ian essay published on Monday, New Republic Senior Editor Noam Scheiber—who grew up speaking both Hebrew and English—explains why he stopped speaking only Hebrew to his three-year-old daughter. “My Hebrew self turns out to be much colder, more earnest, and, let’s face it, less articulate,” he writes. “In English, my natural sensibility is patient and understated. My style in Hebrew was hectoring and prosecutorial.”

I understand the feeling. My not-so-fluent French “self” is most comfortable talking about classroom supplies. It’s surprising, though, that people who are actually fluent in two languages also feel their personality shifting as they switch between languages. Yet researchers have confirmed this: Between 2001 and 2003, linguists Jean-Marc Dewaele and Aneta Pavlenko asked over a thousand bilinguals whether they “feel like a different person” when they speak different langauges. Nearly two-thirds said they did.

How does that play out in day-to-day speech? In 1964, Susan Ervin, a sociolinguist at the University of California, Berkeley, set out to explore the differences in how bilinguals represent the same stories in different languages. She recruited 64 French adults who lived in the U.S. and were fluent in both French and English. On average, they had spent 12 years living in the U.S.; 40 were married to an American. On two separate occasions, six weeks apart, Ervin gave them the “Thematic Apperception Test”: She showed her subjects a series of illustrations and asked them to make up a three-minute story to accompany each scene. In one session, the volunteer and experimenter spoke only French, while the other session was conducted entirely in English.


Image from the Thematic Apperception Test

Image from the Thematic Apperception Test

Ervin then analyzed the stories, looking at the different themes incorporated into the narratives. When she compared the two sets of storiesshe identified some significant topical differences. The English stories more often featured female achievement, physical aggression, verbal aggression toward parents, and attempts to escape blame, while the French stories were more likely to include domination by elders, guilt, and verbal aggression toward peers.

In 1968, Ervin—by this point, “Ervin-Tripp”—designed another experiment to further explore her hypothesis that the content of bilinguals’ speech would change along with the language. This time, Ervin-Tripp looked at Japanese women living in the San Francisco area, most of whom were married to American men and many of whom had American children. Most of the women were largely isolated from other Japanese in America, and spoke Japanese only while visiting Japan or talking to their bilingual friends. Ervin-Tripp had a bilingual interviewer give the women various verbal tasks in both Japanese and in English, and found—as she expected—important differences.

For instance, when the women were asked to complete the following sentences, their answers differed depending on the language in which the questions was asked:

Scholars have also used more qualitative methods to try to understand language’s impact on personality. In 1998, Michele Koven, a researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, spent a year and a half carrying out ethnographic research with bilingual Parisian adults whose parents had immigrated from Portugal. All of her subjects were fluent in both French and Portuguese, and most maintained close ties to Portugal while living in France; many planned on returning eventually, though most also had monolingual French friends. Koven focused specifically on how her subjects represented themselves in narratives of personal experience, which she elicited by asking them to recount various life events in both languages. When Koven transcribed and analyzed the content of their accounts, she saw that her subjects emphasized different traits in their characters, depending on which language they were speaking. For instance, the women in the French stories were more likely to stand up for themselves, whereas the female characters in the Portuguese narratives tended to cede to others’ demands. And their own personas changed, too. One girl, Koven writes, sounded like “an angry, hip suburbanite” when she spoke French, and a “frustrated, but patient, well-mannered bank customer who does not want attention drawn to the fact that she is an émigré” when she spoke Portuguese. Whether that’s due to the different context in which she learned French and Portuguese, an inherent difference between the two languages, or some combination, researchers have yet to figure out.

Image via Shutterstock

 

posted in: the plankculturelanguagebilingualismlinguistics