Repost (Part Two): Ten film quotes we all get wrong (The Telegraph online)

Ten film quotes we all get wrong

(Cf. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-filter/10553934/Ten-film-quotes-we-all-get-wrong.html)
You might already know that Casablanca’s Sam was never asked to play it again. But what are the other most common mistakes when quoting from classic films?

Famous film misquotes

Luke, Clarice, Mrs Robinson, and a punk

By 

8:36AM GMT 14 Jan 2014

Correcting someone on a misremembered line from a film is the behaviour of a true pub bore. As they didn’t say in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance: when the misquote becomes the line, use the misquote.

Still, in a bid to protect you from the pedants, Telegraph Men selects the top film phrases we all get wrong…

1. Casablanca

The misquote: Play it again, Sam

The quote: Play it, Sam. Play ‘As Time Goes By’

Fact: more people have now said “Did you know they never actually say ‘Play it again, Sam?’” than have said “Play it again, Sam”. This is the misquoter’s misquote, its place in cinema history cemented when compulsive reference dropper Woody Allen used it as the title of his 1972 film.

2. Dirty Harry

The misquote: Do you feel lucky, punk?

The quote: Being as this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you’ve got to ask yourself one question: ‘Do I feel lucky?’ Well, do ya punk?

It’s easy to see how this one became truncated – the misquote gets across Clint Eastwood’s sentiment perfectly while taking a fifth of the time of the original.

3. The Silence of the Lambs

The misquote: Hello, Clarice…

The quote: Good evening, Clarice…

Unfortunately nobody seems to be called Clarice nowadays so this one is hard to roll out in a social setting. The important thing is that you say it while wearing a muzzle.

4. The Empire Strikes Back

The misquote: Luke, I am your father

The quote: No, I am your father

Out by a single word, this one topped LoveFilm’s list of memorable misquotes. Luke’s reaction to the revelation – an extended, screamed “No!” – is also eminently quotable and has provided the basis for many youtube re-edits.

5. Field of Dreams

The misquote: If you build it, they will come

The quote: If you build it, he will come

Kevin Costner’s character walks around in his crop field, repeatedly hearing the words “If you build it, he will come”. He is amazed that his wife, sitting on the porch, can’t hear them too – and it appears a generation of filmgoers wasn’t paying much attention either.

6. The Graduate

The misquote: Mrs Robinson, are you trying to seduce me?

The quote: Mrs Robinson, you’re trying to seduce me. Aren’t you?

This is one of the few misquotes that gets the tone of the original wrong as well as the words. With the misremembered line, Dustin Hoffman’s character appears much surer of himself, but in the original there’s a moment when he genuinely doesn’t know whether the older woman is trying to seduce him or not.

7. The Wizard of Oz

The misquote: I don’t think we’re in Kansas anymore, Toto

The quote: Toto, I’ve got a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore

…we must be over the rainbow! And while we’re there, there are better lines from the 1939 film to quote. What about: “If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t look any further than my own backyard; because if it isn’t there, I never really lost it to begin with”? Or just “There’s no place like home”.

8. All About Eve

The misquote: Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy ride

The quote: Fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy night

Unless you can match Bette Davis’s effortless disdain it’s best not to try this one in either version.

9. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

The misquote: Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?

The quote: Magic mirror on the wall, who is the fairest one of all?

The ‘mirror, mirror’ line is now so standard that it provided the title to the 2012 updating of the Snow White tale.

10. Wall Street

The misquote: Greed is good

The quote: The point is, ladies and gentleman, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works.

This misquote became a shorthand for the perceived attitude of City traders in the ’80s, and the sentiment was recently revived in a speech by Boris Johnson when he claimed that “greed [is] a valuable spur to economic activity”.

Forgetting the exact wording is going to be the least of your worries if you find yourself quoting it to the wrong crowd.

Repost (Part One): Ten literary quotes we all get wrong (The Telegraph online)

Ten literary quotes we all get wrong

(Cf. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-filter/10556095/Ten-literary-quotes-we-all-get-wrong.html)

There’s nothing elementary about it, my dear Watson. And does a rose by any other name really smell as sweet?

By 

12:06PM GMT 21 Jan 2014

 

The ten literary quotations below have passed into common parlance because they encapsulate human truths or sum up much-loved characters. The only problem is, in most cases, nobody actually wrote them…

1. Elementary, my dear Watson

There are plenty of ‘elementaries’ and a few ‘my dear Watsons’ across Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes oeuvre, but the phrase ‘Elementary, my dear Watson’ never appears.

Really puts the time they got the Tube lines mixed up on Sherlock into perspective, doesn’t it?

2. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned

The line from William Congreve’s 1697 poem The Mourning Bride is: Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned/Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned.

It’s a shame to lose the first half of the couplet in the misquotation, but the addition of ‘hath’ lends a charming Olde Worlde feel.

3. I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it

This one is always attributed to Voltaire, but actually came from a 20th-century biography of him by the English writer Evelyn Beatrice Hall.

The author was summarising the philosopher’s attitude, but the first person pronoun led many to take it for a direct quote.

4. Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble

The witches at the opening of Macbeth say “Double, double, toil and trouble”.

It’s surprising anyone still gets this wrong, considering the correct line was cemented in the cultural imagination by the 1993 Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen TV movie which took the quotation as its title.

5. Methinks the lady doth protest too much

The real line, spoken by Queen Gertrude in Hamlet, is “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

It’s a small error compared to the title of the Alanis Morrisette song inspired by the play: “Doth [sic] I Protest Too Much”.

6. A rose by any other name smells just as sweet

The last of our trio of Shakespearean entries, the above is now commonly used but was never said in so many words by Juliet (in Romeo and Juliet).

The actual quote is, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”.

7. Please, Sir, can I have some more?

In Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist, the orphan rises from the table, advances towards the master and says: “Please, sir, I want some more.” The same line that is used in the 1968 musical film Oliver!, so the misquote remains unattributed.

8. Theirs but to do or die

Lord Tennyson’s poem Charge of the Light Brigade reads, Theirs not to make reply/Theirs not to reason why/Theirs but to do and die, but the line is often misquoted by people thinking of a ‘do or die’ mentality.

9. Shaken, not stirred

Ian Fleming’s James Bond asks a barman in Dr No for “A medium Vodka dry Martini – with a slice of lemon peel. Shaken and not stirred”. A single word out, then – but the line “shaken, not stirred” has now been used so often in the Bond films that it’s become ingrained in our image of Bond.

10. Water, water, everywhere, but not a drop to drink

In Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the sailor describes his time stranded at sea: Water, water, everywhere/And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.

The line is regularly misquoted in popular culture, but nowhere quite as spectacularly as by Homer Simpson who, finding himself stranded on a dinghy in the open sea in one episode, exclaims: “Water, water everywhere so let’s all have a drink!”

READ: TEN FILM QUOTES WE ALL GET WRONG

Repost: 13 verbos que utilizamos incorrectamente en español

EL INGLÉS Y LA DESIDIA NOS HAN VENCIDO

13 verbos que utilizamos incorrectamente en español

13 verbos que utilizamos incorrectamente en español

Nos sorprendería conocer la cantidad de verbos que utilizamos incorrectamente. (Corbis)

Hace unas semanas listábamos los siete errores gramaticales que cometemos con más frecuencia en nuestro día a día y que, en muchos casos, estaban originados por la desidia, las prisas y el desinterés. Sin embargo, no es únicamente a la hora de disponer las palabras dentro de una oración cuando cometemos errores imperdonables, sino que también nos equivocamos a la hora de utilizar determinados verbos que con frecuencia empleamos con un sentido diferente al que realmente tienen.

En muchos casos y como ocurría en los errores gramaticales o esas palabras que los españoles pensamos que provienen del inglés (y que realmente nos hemos inventado), estos fallos responden a una influencia desmesurada de idiomas extranjeros como el inglés. En otros casos, empleamos verbos intransitivos (es decir, que exigen un complemento directo) como si fuesen transitivos, o con construcciones gramaticales equivocadas. Por último, lo que ocurre en muchos casos es que nos puede la desgana, y empleamos verbos comodín como “hacer”, “tener” o “haber” en lugar de esforzarnos por encontrar el término que mejor encajaría en dicha oración.

El periodismo en particular y los medios de comunicación en general tienen una gran culpa en ello, como grandes difusores de la lengua que son. A muchas personas sorprenderán algunos de los verbos que presentamos a continuación, puesto que su uso es habitual en televisión o en los periódicos pero, al menos hasta que la Real Academia de la Lengua y otras organizaciones como la Fundeu (Fundación del español urgente) tomen cartas en el asunto, quizá deberíamos revisar el uso que hacemos de ellos.

  • Aplicar. Uno de los anglicismos más extendidos, que proviene del inglés “to apply”, y que en dicho idioma sí significa “solicitar” o “pedir”. Por el contrario, en castellano, no se debe decir nunca que se “aplica a una entrevista de trabajo” o a “una plaza en la universidad”, sino que uno se “presenta” o “solicita” algo. Lo mismo ocurre con el sustantivo “aplicación”, que no puede utilizarse para referirse a un “formulario de ingreso”.
  • Señalizar. Con mucha frecuencia, escuchamos en la retransmisión de un evento deportivo que el árbitro ha “señalizado” una falta, un fuera de juego o el final del partido. En todos esos casos, el periodista debería haber empleado el verbo “señalar”, puesto que señalizar significa “colocar en las carreteras y en las vías de comunicación las señales que indican bifurcaciones, cruces, pasos a nivel y otras para que sirvan de guía a los usuarios”. Y a eso no es a lo que se dedican los colegiados.
  • Resaltar. Aunque pueda sorprender a algunos, “resaltar” tiene su origen como verbo intransitivo, es decir, que no puede ir acompañado de un complemento directo. Tan sólo en su cuarta acepción se aclara que en algunas ocasiones puede ser empleado como transitivo. Fundeu recomienda emplear el verbo “destacar” en lugar de “resaltar” en frases como “el profesor resaltó las capacidades comunicativas del alumno”.
  • Rentar. Del inglés proviene el verbo “to rent”, que significa “alquilar”, y a partir de ahí, multitud de hispanohablantes han comenzado a “rentar un apartamento” para sus vacaciones. Es incorrecto, puesto que rentar tan sólo significa “producir o rendir beneficio o utilidad anualmente”.
  • Abatir. Si bien es cierto que dicho verbo significa “derribar” o “derrocar”, Fundeu advierte que no debemos emplear dicho término como sinónimo de “matar”, “asesinar”, “disparar” o “tirotear”. La organización aclara que hoy en día se abusa de dicha acepción del término y que, si bien no es totalmente incorrecta, debemos intentar emplear alguno de los sinónimos previamente señalados.
  • Finalizar. En demasiadas ocasiones, el verbo “finalizar” (o “terminar” y “acabar”) se emplea como sinónimo de “clausurar”, cuando este debe ser el término empleado para hablar de congresos, charlas o ponencias. Es decir, debemos evitar usar una frase como “el congreso terminó con la participación del decano”. Estos tres verbos son comodines que por su amplitud de significado se emplean con excesiva frecuencia, ya que que existen otros términos que se ajustan mejor a lo que se quiere decir.
  • Adolecer. Uno de los verbos en los que los españoles nos solemos equivocar con más frecuencia, por dos razones diferentes. La primera es que suele emplearse como sinónimo de “carecer de” en sentido positivo, cuando realmente significa “padecer algún mal” o “tener algún defecto”, con un matiz negativo; en ese sentido, “adolecer de una gran riqueza” sería incorrecto, puesto que “una gran riqueza” no es un mal o un defecto. En segundo lugar, debemos recordar que “adolecer” va seguido de la preposición “de”, por lo que decir que alguien “adolece cáncer” es incorrecto.
  • Colapsar. ¿Cuántas veces escuchamos hablar del “colapso de las Torres Gemelas” y cuántas del “derrumbe”? El término es correcto, pero quizá se abusó demasiado de él. Por eso mismo, muchos lingüistas han denunciado la sobreutilización de dicho término. La Fundeu aconseja huir de esta palabra, a la que definen como “excesivamente técnica”, y buscar sinónimos como “destruir”, “paralizar”, “bloquear”, “derrumbar”, etc.
  • Customizar. Un término que cada vez se emplea con más frecuencia como sinónimo de “modificar algo de acuerdo a las preferencias personales”, y que proviene del verbo inglés “to custom”. ¿Para qué emplear este anglicismo si podemos emplear términos castellanos totalmente aceptados como “personalizar”?
  • Acceder. La Fundeu lanza una advertencia sobre el abuso de este verbo, que está comenzando a utilizarse con demasiada frecuencia como sinónimo de “entrar”. Aunque no sea completamente incorrecto, es preferible decir que alguien “entra” a un edificio que señalar que “accede” a él.
  • Masticar. La mayor parte de los hispanohablantes piensan que “mascar” y “masticar” son sinónimos absolutos, pero hay un pequeño matiz que los separa: “masticar” se emplea únicamente para la comida, como paso previo a su ingesta, mientras que “mascar” se refiere a “partir y triturar algo con la boca”. Por lo tanto, podemos hablar del “mascado” de hojas de coca.
  • Falsificar. Otras dos palabras casi sinónimas que suelen dar problemas en su utilización diaria son “falsear”  y “falsificar”. Fundeu recomienda emplear el término “falsificar” para referirse a documentos, escritos, facturas, etc., y “falsear”, en un sentido más figurado, como en el caso de “falsear la realidad”.
  • Cesar. Un término también utilizado con frecuencia en el ámbito del periodismo deportivo. Si bien está aceptado que un entrenador o trabajador sea “destituido” (o “relevado” o “despedido”), no lo es que “sea cesado”, puesto que “cesar” un verbo intransitivo que no puede construir de manera pasiva. Así pues, lo correcto es “José Mourinho cesa como entrenador del Real Madrid”, no “José Mourinho fue cesado como entrenador del Real Madrid”.Cf. http://www.elconfidencial.com/alma-corazon-vida/2013/06/25/13-verbos-que-utilizamos-incorrectamente-en-espanol-123633

Have a break: The Offensive Translator [video]

The Offensive Translator*

*NB: actually, she’s not a translator, she is an interpreter. 😉

Translators be like.

This is how I feel about being a translator.

It’s like… there were three of you. 

 

1. The Assignment

tumblr_mwdd008qOf1r9xerro4_250

2. Sudden self-awareness 

tumblr_mwdseckAke1qi32tro1_500

3. The Deadline

tumblr_mwey9kqKXJ1sncavqo8_250

4. The Whole Process

tumblr_mwbotiPVni1rsdwnao6_250

5. The Aknowledgement

tumblr_mwbotiPVni1rsdwnao3_250

6. The Final Effort

tumblr_mwf2zzA6hy1sw8xpso1_250

7. The Delivery

tumblr_mwdd008qOf1r9xerro5_250


“The power of three will set us free” –Charmed

Summon all your doppelgängers to you!


[A huge thank you to Nina Dobrev for being the Guest Star on my post
and
for playing Elena Gilbert, Katherine Pierce/Katerina Petrova and Amara
in the tv series The Vampire Diaries]

Frozen: Sing-along (multilingual session)

Watch “Let It Go” From Disney’s ‘Frozen’

Performed In 25 Different Languages

JAN. 22, 2014

How they managed to get the tones so similar and so lovely is pretty impressive (it almost sounds like they’re all performed by the same girl) — which one is your favorite singer? TC mark

Cf. http://thoughtcatalog.com/sophie-martin/2014/01/watch-let-it-go-from-disneys-frozen-performed-in-25-different-languages/

Errori di adattamento, traduzione e doppiaggio (I)

Il post di oggi è un po’ più leggero rispetto a quelli dei giorni scorsi. [ ndr: ma estremamente più lungo AHAHAHAHAH -.- ]
Nel titolo ho addirittura messo tra parentesi un “I” per darmi un tono. (O tirarmi un po’ su di morale…! Onestamente non ne ho idea!) 😀 😀 😀
Non so se farò altri interventi del genere, ma mi piace pensare che avrò tempo e modo di scrivere anche post divertenti e inserire altre chicche del mondo del cinema, dei telefilm o della letteratura straniera.

[NB: uno l’ho già pronto, forse lo lascerò nelle bozze ancora per un po’…]

Non tutti sanno che sono particolarmente fissata con la saga “Pirati dei Caraibi“. Infatti, ai tempi dell’Università (*sigh* come passa il tempo…) volevo inserire la trilogia (nel frattempo mutata in tetralogia) nel comparto scientifico che avrei utilizzato per l’analisi della mia tesi di laurea triennale sugli errori di traduzione ed adattamento degli script originali nel cinema e nelle serie tv. Purtroppo, l’argomento era troppo vasto e riguardava una materia non curriculare (ndt: “traduzione audiovisiva” era una materia della specialistica e quindi non era attinente al mio piano di studi della triennale), perciò la Professoressa dirottò il mio diabolico piano su altro.

Savvy?
Comprendi?

Infatti, qualche anno dopo, ho “ripiegato” su una tematica diversa. {però questo ve lo racconto un’altra volta…}

Nonostante ciò, non mi sono arresa e ho continuato imperterrita a seguire le mirabolanti peripezie di Captain Jack Sparrow e di quei poveri adattatori che non hanno saputo proprio rendere giustizia alla saga.

La cosa che maggiormente mi ha perplessa e sconcertata – presumibilmente prima sconcertata e poi perplessa – è stata la scelta dei titoli dei vari film che, fin dal primo (datato 2003), ha puntualmente lasciato intendere che NESSUNO si fosse preso il gusto di visionare la pellicola prima di fare l’adattamento.
Ma andiamo con ordine.
Ora, capisco che il genere possa non piacere a tutti e che magari Johnny Depp o Orlando Bloom non siano il prototipo del vostro uomo ideale, così come Keira (biondina e segaligna) non lo sia della vostra “immortale amatissima”; posso anche passare sopra al fatto che, non sapendo dell’avvento del “2” e del “3” (e poi anche del “4” a cui, si vocifera, dovrebbe fare seguito un “5”), per il primo film sia stato omesso il riferimento alla serie “Pirati dei Caraibi”, MA (c’è sempre un ‘ma’) non si può tradurre “[Pirates of the Caribbean:] The Curse of the Black Pearl” (chiarissimo!) con un raffazzonato “La maledizione della prima luna“. Cosa c’era di difficile nel tradurre con un semplice “La maledizione della Perla Nera“? Perla Nera sapeva troppo di soap opera? Lo so, non era abbastanza EPICO. Just for the record: è il nome della nave.
Qui, si potrebbe aprire una parentesi di una 20ina d’anni in cui riprendere concetti trattati e stratrattati sul perché e per come si debba scegliere di tradurre letteralmente un testo oppure cercare di mantenere il senso di ciò che si intendeva nella lingua di partenza, portando il messaggio sullo stesso livello cognitivo dell’audience della lingua di arrivo con scelte linguistiche parzialmente o completamente differenti da quelle di partenza.
Io, personalmente, il film l’ho visto almeno 200 volte e di quella “prima luna” non c’è traccia. Barbossa dice “La luce della luna ci rivela per ciò che siamo in realtà. Siamo uomini maledetti: non possiamo morire, per cui non siamo morti, ma non siamo nemmeno vivi“. Eh. La ‘luna’ c’è (e non ci piove). E la ‘prima’? Mistero!

Crozza_Kazzenger
Kazzenger!

Nel 2006, la storia si ripete. Qui un po’ mi ha pianto il cuore, lo ammetto. Il titolo originale è struggente e al tempo stesso epico nella sua semplicità (once again). Il secondo capitolo della saga, infatti, si intitola “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead man’s chest“. L’adattamento italiano non è riuscito nuovamente a rendere giustizia all’originale. Il film da noi è uscito con il titolo “Pirati dei Caraibi: la maledizione del forziere fantasma“.
Ovvio.
Perché cercare di riprendersi un minimo dal precedente scivolone? Giammai! Meglio continuare con ‘sta storia della ‘maledizione’ che ci piace assai! 😀 E va bene… Dietro a quel “chest” c’è un bellissimo gioco di parole volutamente scelto in inglese per collegare il fantomatico “uomo morto” al “forziere” (e/o al suo “petto”). Nonostante l’adattamento non mi piaccia tantissimo, devo ammettere che il senso della storyline è mantenuto. Il forziere c’è, non è proprio ‘fantasma’, ma Jack Sparrow è alla sua ricerca, perciò lui non sa dove sia e questo è grosso modo il plot del secondo film.

Una chicca estratta da questo capitolo è un errore di adattamento (e doppiaggio). Da quando l’ho individuato, lo posto ovunque.

Errori di (traduzione e) doppiaggio:

[eng/orig. version] Hammer-head shark Pirate: Five men still alive, the rest have moved on.

[trad/doppiaggio] Pirata Squalo Martello: 15 rimasti vivi, il resto è trapassato.

La domanda sorge spontanea: se sullo schermo ci sono 5 attori pronti per essere giustiziati, un dubbio non ti viene?

No, evidentemente no. 😀

large

Devo dire che della [vera] trilogia questo è il capitolo che mi è piaciuto meno, forse perché lascia lo spettatore con moltissimi buchi temporali nella storia, molti interrogativi, qualche intuizione abbozzata a causa dei nuovi personaggi introdotti e, in più, non ha una vera e propria conclusione. [ndr: doveva essere un film “ponte”; un collegamento tra il primo film, di cui non ci si aspettava un così grande successo, e il successivo, la conclusione della saga, su cui c’erano altissime aspettative. Effettivamente è così ‘ponte’ che quando appaiono i titoli di coda non riesci ad alzarti in piedi perché pensi ci sia ancora altro da vedere.]
Veniam perciò al III capitolo uscito nel 2007. L’unico che EFFETTIVAMENTE non ha subito grossi sconvolgimenti a livello di adattamento. Voci che erano trapelate prima della sua uscita avevano dato, come probabili, due titoli differenti, cioè “At World’s End” e “At Worlds End“. Non proprio lievissima la differenza tra le due opzioni. La prima si presta ad un più sottile gioco di parole, mentre la seconda lascia solamente intendere che il capitolo finale vede la fine dei “mondi” [ndr: quali mondi?]. La scelta è poi ricaduta sul primo titolo, che gioca sulla fine del mondo intesa come atto finale di un’Opera, quindi una sorta di resa dei conti, ma anche come luogo ben preciso dove REALMENTE i protagonisti si recano durante il film. [WARNING: major spoiler!!!]

not the best time
Non mi pare il momento migliore! (Elizabeth Swan)

La traduzione in italiano è abbastanza fedele ed infatti il film esce in Italia con il titolo “Pirati dei Caraibi: Ai confini del mondo” che riesce a mantenere parzialmente intatto il messaggio voluto con il titolo inglese. Potrei stare a parlare per dieci ore solo di questo film. E’ in assoluto il mio preferito. 🙂

[*FANGIRLING TIME*]

Keep a weather eye on the horizon...
Tieni gli occhi piantati sull’orizzonte… (Will Turner)

A distanza di 4 anni (è il 2011), esce nelle sale italiane, poi in quelle americane, “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides“. Il film è liberamente tratto dall’omonimo romanzo di Tim Powers noto in Italia con il titolo “Mari stregati“. Un lettore/Uno spettatore attento a questo punto ha già fatto 2+2, vero? Il titolo italiano è quindi “Pirati dei Caraibi: Mari stregati“.

HAHAHA... NO.

Questa volta il titolo è stato tradotto con “Pirati dei Caraibi: Oltre i confini del mare“. Evidentemente, un più letterale “[PdC:] Verso acque straniere” o “Su maree sconosciute” avrebbe interrotto la continuità delle scelte linguistiche già applicate alla traduzione ed utilizzare lo stesso titolo del libro avrebbe implicato l’infrazione di qualche diritto d’autore (?). Dunque, la mossa più appropriata è stata – di nuovo – seguire la scia del capitolo precedente. Nasce perciò un collegamento con gli ex “confini del mondo”, con l'”Aqua de vida” segnata sulla mappa,  che porterà Jack Sparrow a navigare su acque straniere, più lontane. Ok. La domanda resta: PERCHé?

WHY?!

Per la mia gioia – e per quella di chi come me si è appassionato alla saga non solo per gli attori e i personaggi, ma anche per le vicende linguistiche che le gravitano attorno – è in preparazione il V capitolo della serie, il cui titolo sarà “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales“. Letteralmente possiamo tradurlo con “[PdC:] Gli uomini morti non raccontano storie” oppure, parafrasando un po’, con “[PdC:] I morti non mentono“. In verità “dead men tell no tales” è un modo di dire anglosassone che significa “dead people will not betray any secrets” e che in italiano suona più o meno come “I morti non tradiscono alcun segreto“.
Sono veramente curiosa di vedere che cosa tireranno fuori dal loro cappello gli adattatori . 😉 L’uscita è prevista per luglio 2015, manca solamente un annetto.

Vi lascio con un video STUPENDO in chiave ironica in cui vengono evidenziati, scena per scena, tutti gli errori in “POTC: The Curse of the Black Pearl“. Io sto ancora ridendo…

P.S.: grazie Wendy per avermi fatto capire che le .gif possono essere estremamente utili! 🙂

Repost: Tips for setting your translation rates, for professional translators.

Tips for setting your translation rates, for professional translators.*

PEEMPIP January 21, 2014 Articles in English, Επάγγελμα: μεταφραστής

tree

by Popie Matsouka

One of the first difficulties that a professional translator has to face is deciding their rates. Personally, I started researching what the current market rates were before I even finished my studies, and I still believe it is the best strategy. I used to contact other colleagues, my professors, research any available agency website at the time, and ask around, trying to compile a list of what other translators out there were charging for their services. This has proven to be very effective, and it is the strategy I would suggest to you today. Not to mention, I’m still doing it, 10+ years later, just to have a general feeling of the market, and be able to expect client’s reactions.

Nowadays, with the extensive use of the Internet, the use of social media and the massive networks of professionals, it is much easier to do such a thing, and here are a few tips for new professionals who wish to understand better how we charge, and what we charge.

First of all, you have to think of yourself as a small business. Not only will you be charging for your professional services, but what you earn should also cover all your expenses, including living costs, taxes, accounting fees, subscriptions to professional associations, promotion and advertising of your business, computer software and hardware, etc. At the end of each month, you should be able to have something that could be considered a salary, which will cover all your needs. Find out which hourly rate would help you achieve that. Yes, it is not a steady income, being a freelance professional involves that risk unfortunately, but it is an income nevertheless, and only treating it as one will help you evolve.

Most new professionals think that offering lower rates will bring them more clients, which may be true, but what they fail to see is that offering lower rates also diminishes the value of their time and efforts. Furthermore, constantly working with a handful of clients with low rates might prevent you from finding other clients with higher rates. Not to mention that always working with lower rates will most probably make it hard for you to make ends meet. Always keep an eye in the future, and evaluate your relations with your clients based on the long-run. Is booking all your time worth what you might be losing from trying for new clients with higher rates? Are you going to burn out yourself whilst working for low rates, when you could have been working less hours and earning more money? Think about that beforehand.

fight 

In addition, do not be afraid to negotiate. Negotiating is generally expected in all types of business, and negotiating does not make you look unprofessional. Rather the opposite. You should charge what you think you are worth. Not too high to drive yourself out of the market, but not too low either. You can leave a margin, for example to be competitive, but you do not want to look cheap either. Because, let’s face it, some professionals who charge too low make most clients suspect that they do so just because their services are not good enough to justify a higher rate. Or, that they will finish the project they are assigned very quickly and sloppily, just to get more work, because their rates are so low. On the opposite side, charging too high might make your potential client think that you are over-reaching, and unless you are one hundred percent sure of your abilities, they will find some flaw in your work that will make them question you and your professionalism. Discuss with your client the rates you would like to receive and you will see that with dialogue you might earn more than you initially thought to ask for.

One more thing you can do is develop rates for each client individually. Not all clients can offer the same, and not all clients demand the same, so adjust your rates based on who your client is and how much you think they can pay. Offering discounts for steady workflows or large volumes is a good strategy too; negotiate with your client and ask them to send work exclusively to you for a lower rate, but remember that your quality must remain as high as it would be for a higher rate, otherwise you will appear unprofessional and they will not want to work with you again. Also, in that effort, try not to harm your colleagues by offering an extremely low rate, thus “breaking” the market. Even half a cent is a decent offer; think about the general conditions of the market before making your bid.

Also, remember to always ask for the details of a project. Learn before you start working on a project what it involves, try to determine the amount of effort that will be required on your part, the time you will have to spend on it, the difficulties it might present, and then you can set your rate according to what you think is fair. You can even ask for a sample, if there is one available. Remember that, most clients have a background in this industry and are well aware of how much your services will probably cost them, so do not try to be sneaky, just be honest. And, of course, negotiate!

Keep in mind that you do not have to have a set pricelist. You can increase or decrease your rates depending on the client, the project, the type of work you are required to do. But always be honest, it is the best policy. Telling a client that you can lower your rates if they send you more work is not something to be embarrassed of. It’s just good business tactics. Lowering your rates because you are simply afraid is not. Do not ask for a rate change in the middle of a project, it is unprofessional, even if you found out that the project is more difficult than expected. You can mention it to your PM, but simply asking for a higher rate is not polite. And on the flip side, do not be afraid to ask for more, from before beginning the project, if you see that it requires more than what your usual rate covers.

chinaman 

Finally, know that you can either charge by the hour, or the word, per source or target word, or per 16 pages or any way you want. The parameters vary, the methods vary, and the negotiations between you and your client can influence your decisions. Do some research, decide what you want, ask colleagues and professional associations (like www.peempip.gr, for example, the Panhellenic Association of Professional Translators Graduates of the Ionian University, or any other professional association in your country) about their methods, and you will find what you need.

In general, rates vary significantly. Lately I heard of agencies in Greece offering to freelancers as low as €0.015/source word to translators, which is simply ludicrous and, I dare say, unprofessional. €0.035 is a good place to start, if you are a student and need the experience. From there, you can go as high as you can convince your client to give you, based on your quality, professionalism and experience. A good translator will not easily lower their rates just for the sake of working, because they have put a lot of time and effort in becoming what they are: Good translators. In Greece and in the current market (unfortunately), €0.04 is a decent rate to start and work your way up. Anything lower than that is just a waste of time if you are a professional who values their time, and in my opinion, it only puts a crack in the foundations of what we all want and strive for: fair rates for our good work.

Some examples of methods of charging that I have seen in this industry are listed below. Note that this list is not exhaustive, nor can it be considered a standard, the volumes can vary significantly:

  • Simple Translation -> Per source word, or per page (1 page ≈ 250-300 words).
  • Technical Translation -> Per source word
  • Technical Translation, Software strings -> Per source word or per hour
  • Literary Translation -> Per 16 standard book pages
  • Glossary translation -> 30-35 terms per hour (medium difficulty terminology)
  • Editing (or “Review”) -> Mostly per source word (on the total of words), but sometimes per hour, at a rate of approx. 1000 source words/hour
  • Proofreading -> Per hour, at a rate of approx. 2000 source words/hour
  • QA checks, engineering -> Per hour

LSO (Linguistic sign-off), LQA (Linguistic Quality Assurance), FQA (Formatting Quality Assurance), etc -> Per hour, at a rate of approx. 2500 source words/hour (or 15 pages/hour)

*This is only an informative article. The writer assumes no responsibility for any misunderstandings

Popie Matsouka is currently the Senior Project Manager and Lead Medical Translator and Editor of Technografia. She also holds the position of Quality Assurance Specialist, having specialized in translation and localization QA software technology. She is the resident tech/IT expert, and after having worked as a localization tools trainer, she recently also became a beta tester for SDL Trados Studio. Her education includes being an Apple trained Support Professional, plus a PC/MAC and LAN technician, apart from being a CAT tools expert. She also volunteers for the Red Cross, and is a firm believer that if we all work together we can make a great difference in this world, combining our professional and our personal strengths.

Repost: Are you a professional translator? If so, do NOT lower your translation rates!

Are you a professional translator? If so, do NOT lower your translation rates!

By Marcela Reyes, MBA on March 7, 2010

When was the last time you asked your doctor or your lawyer to give you a discount on his/her fees? Unless your doctor or lawyer is a relative or good friend, it’s very likely you wouldn’t dare ask such a professional service provider to give you a discount, would you? So, if you consider yourself a professional translator, how come you continue to allow others to ask you to reduce your rates? But this fact is not the worst part of the situation. Many professional translators are lowering their rates in a desperate attempt to get business.

Clients are asking for discounts, and translators are honoring their requests more and more every day. When you provide a discount on your services, you are giving permission to others to think your services are not worth much. And, unfortunately, this trend is adversely affecting the entire translation and localization industry.

Price your services right. The price you set for your services must be determined by the value perception your clients are getting in return for their money. Are you meeting your clients’ expectations? What are they walking away with? Why should they buy from you and not your competitors?

Learn to say “no.” When you reduce your rates, you are sending a distress signal, not just about you but also about the entire industry. When you reduce your rates even just one time, it’s going to be very difficult to say no the next time this same client comes back. One of my dearest copywriters told me once when I asked him to come down on his price that he would feel very uncomfortable with himself if he were to reduce his rates. I loved his professional approach to standing behind his work.

Focus on your promise of value. When you know and have proof that what you are offering is of great “value” to your clients, make sure this is consistently displayed in your service delivery. Rather than discounting your rates to match competitors, focus on value-added features. Think about ways you can bundle in certain supplementary services, or create various offerings at various price levels so you can accommodate your client’s budget.

Improve your service offering. In today’s economy there are so many products and services that the market is simply oversaturated. Translation is seen by many as a commodity for the simple reason that everybody is focusing on the same “attributes.” Translation should never follow product-marketing models. In the service business it’s all about that “special touch” you add to your offering. Your clients are simply looking for someone they can trust. They want to make sure you are reliable, that you are consistently delivering good value to them, and that you are always there for them. Benefits and service features are always good selling points. But a great relationship with your client is your best selling point.

Focus on your target market. If you are continually being asked to lower your rates, it is very likely you are targeting the wrong clients. Ask yourself if you are wasting your time trying to attract clients that are not willing and able to pay what you are worth. When you decide to focus on a niche market, it is important you understand what your clients’ practices and preferences are. Furthermore, make sure you have the capabilities and competencies to do an excellent job of delivering a high-value translation offering.

Create a strong brand. Just as big corporations develop their brands, translators can also develop a strong, differentiated brand. When you concentrate on developing a strong brand, you will not only become easily recognized but also create an emotional connection with your clients. Your competitors can try to replicate your processes, business model, technology, etc., but it will be very difficult for them to reproduce those beliefs and attitudes that you have established in the minds of your clients.

Remember, when we are selling a product or service, it’s not about us. It’s about our clients. Focus on your clients’ needs and wants, and always look for ways to enhance the relationship. In the absence of value, price becomes the only decision factor. Do not reduce your rates; instead, increase your competitiveness and the value-added features to your services.

via Are you a professional translator? If so, do NOT lower your translation rates!.

L’articolo è stato tradotto da Antonella

Sei un traduttore professionista? Se lo sei, NON abbassare le tue tariffe di traduzione

— archiviato sotto: Materiali di consultazione

Questo contributo della collega Marcela Jenney spiega i motivi per cui le tariffe dei traduttori devono essere rispettate al pari di quelle di altri professionisti. La traduzione non è una merce, ma un servizio.

Quando è stata l’ultima volta che hai chiesto al tuo medico o a tuo avvocato di farti uno sconto sul loro onorario? A meno che il tuo medico o il tuo avvocato sia un parente o un ottimo amico, è molto probabile che che non oseresti chiedere a uno di questi fornitori di servizi professionali di farti uno sconto, vero? Quindi, se ti consideri un traduttore professionista, com’è che continui a permettere agli altri di chiederti di ridurre le tue tariffe? Ma questa non è la cosa peggiore della situazione. Molti traduttori professionisti abbassano le proprie tariffe nel tentativo disperato di ottenere del lavoro.

I clienti chiedono sconti e i traduttori onorano le loro richieste sempre di più ogni giorno. Quando fornite uno sconto sui vostri servizi, concedete agli altri il permesso di pensare che i vostri servizi non valgano poi così tanto. E, sfortunatamente, questo trend si ripercuote negativamente sull’intero settore della traduzione e della localizzazione.

Date il giusto prezzo ai vostri servizi. Il prezzo che impostate per i vostri servizi deve essere stabilito dalla percezione del valore che i vostri clienti hanno nel rapporto fra ciò che ottengono e ciò che pagano. Soddisfate le aspettative dei vostri clienti? Con cosa se ne tornano a casa? Perché dovrebbero acquistare da voi e non dalla concorrenza?

Imparate a dire “no”. Quando riducete le vostre tariffe, mandate un segnale di sofferenza, che non riguarda soltanto voi ma l’intero settore. Quando riducete le vostre tariffe, anche solo una volta, diventa molto difficile dire di no la volta successiva a questo stesso cliente che ritorna per un altro lavoro. Uno dei miei più cari copywriter una volta mi ha detto quando gli ho chiesto di abbassare il prezzo che si sarebbe sentito molto a disagio con se stesso se l’avesse fatto. Ho apprezzato molto il suo approccio professionale alla base del suo lavoro.

Concentratevi sul vostro impegno a fornire valore. Quando sapete e avete la prova che ciò che state offrendo è di grande “valore” per i vostri clienti, accertatevi che ciò sia chiaramente visibile nella vostra fornitura di servizi. Invece di fare sconti sulle vostre tariffe per allinearvi alla concorrenza, concentratevi sulle caratteristiche a valore aggiunto. Pensate a dei modi con cui potreste fornire un pacchetto di servizi supplementari o creare varie offerte a vari livelli di prezzo in modo da venire incontro al budget del vostro cliente.

Migliorate la vostra offerta di servizi. Nell’economia odierna, vi sono così tanti prodotti e servizi che il mercato è semplicemente saturo. La traduzione viene vista da molti come una merce per il semplice motivo che tutti si concentrano sugli stessi “attributi.” La traduzione non dovrebbe mai seguire i modelli di marketing dei prodotti. Nell’offerta di servizi, la cosa importante è il “tocco speciale” che aggiungete alla vostra offerta. I vostri clienti cercano semplicemente qualcuno di cui potersi fidare. Vogliono accertarsi che siate affidabili, che forniate un lavoro di valore in modo costante e che ci siate sempre per loro. I vantaggi e le caratteristiche del servizio sono sempre dei fattori positivi di vendita. Ma un ottimo rapporto con il vostro cliente è meglio.

Concentratevi sul mercato di destinazione. Se vi chiedono di continuo di abbassare le vostre tariffe, molto probabilmente vi state rivolgendo ai clienti sbagliati. Chiedetevi se state perdendo tempo cercando di attirare clienti che non vogliono o non sono in gradi di pagare ciò che valete. Quando decidete di concentrarvi su un mercato di nicchia, è importante comprendere quali siano le preferenze dei vostri clienti. Inoltre, accertatevi di possedere le capacità e le competenze per fare un lavoro eccellente nel fornire traduzioni ad alto valore.

Create un marchio forte. Al pari delle grandi aziende che sviluppano il proprio marchio, anche i traduttori possono sviluppare un marchio forte e distintivo. Quando vi concentrate sullo sviluppo di un marchio forte, non solo diventerete facilmente riconoscibili, ma creerete anche un collegamento emotivo con i vostri clienti. La vostra concorrenza potrà tentare di replicare i vostri processi, modelli di lavoro, tecnologia ecc., ma sarà molto difficile che riproducano le convinzioni che avete stabilito nella mente dei vostri clienti.

Ricordate, quando vendiamo un prodotto o un servizio, non riguarda noi. Riguarda i nostri clienti. Concentratevi sulle necessità e sui desideri dei clienti e cercate sempre dei modi per migliorare il rapporto. In assenza di valore, il prezzo diventa il solo fattore decisionale. Non riducete le vostre tariffe; al contrario, aumentate la vostra competitività e le caratteristiche a valore aggiunto dei vostri servizi.

Articolo in lingua inglese comparso sul blog di Marcela Jenney.

antonella. (2010, June 09). Sei un traduttore professionista? Se lo sei, NON abbassare le tue tariffe di traduzione. Retrieved January 21, 2014, from antotranslation.com Web site: http://www.antotranslation.com/materiali/sei-un-traduttore-professionista-se-lo-sei-non-abbassare-le-tue-tariffe-di-traduzione.